Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary  The magnificent brick tower is Tudor,  late 15th or early 16th century. The nave is Norman with a south aisle added in the 13th century. At the east end the church has been altered and extended many times: the south chapel was added in 1556, the east wall in 1620, and the north chapel was built in 1625 onto a chancel wall built c.1500:  Space for the organ was created in 1905 and a vestry and office added in 1974. : Church, Essex, Ingatestone, St Edmund, St Mary, Norman, Tudor, Medieval, C13, C15, C16
1 Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary
Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary - Interior  Looking across the altar into the 1556 south chapel. Between the chancel and the chapel lies an alabaster memorial to William, 2nd Lord Petre 1573 - 1637. : Church, Essex, Ingatestone, St Edmund, St Mary, Norman, Tudor, Medieval, C13, C15, C16, Arcade, Interior, Altar, Petre, Monument
2 Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary - Interior
Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary - Petre Monument  Alabaster memorial to the Petres, 1572 : Church, Essex, Ingatestone, St Edmund, St Mary, Norman, Tudor, Medieval, C13, C15, C16, Monument
3 Ingatestone -SS Edmund & Mary - Petre Monument
Ingrave - St Nicholas  Not many churches were built in the 18th century. St Nicholas's was built in 1734, commissioned by the 8th Lord Petre of Thorndon Hall as replacements for the medieval churches in West Horndon and Ingrave.  It lies in an octagonal plot - a design echoed in the original landscaping designs of Thorndon Hall, with it's 'west' tower actually facing south-southwest.  Octagonal turrets either side of the brick tower rise above the arched parapet. The imposing tower has been likened to a municipal water tower. : Church, Essex, Ingrave, St Nicholas, C18, Petre
4 Ingrave - St Nicholas
Kelvedon - St Mary Immaculate  Kelvedon's Catholic church was built in 1891, by CT Thorn. Enlarged in 1909. : Church, Essex, Kelvedon, Catholic, Mary
5 Kelvedon - St Mary Immaculate
Kelvedon - St Mary the Virgin  Grade I listed. The nave and aisles are 13th century, the chancel, tower and spire, 14th century. Some earlier, Norman brickwork is visible in the north west corner. The nave was re-roofed in the 15th century. The porch was rebuilt in 1842-2. Much of the exterior was refaced with flint in 1876-7.  The church yard is lovely. : Church, Essex, Kelvedon, St Mary, Grade 1, C13, C14
6 Kelvedon - St Mary the Virgin
Kelvedon Hatch - St Nicholas 1895  The church was designed by John Newman, who lived in the village. His design shows the late Victorian interest in the skill of the craftsman and the rejection of industrialisation. The church was built in 1895 in red brick, exposed internally, and consists of chancel, nave, organ chamber, vestry and south porch. Above the porch is a small bell tower with a louvred belfry and shingled spire. : Church, Essex, Kelvedon, Hatch, St Nicholas
7 Kelvedon Hatch - St Nicholas 1895
Kelvedon Hatch - Organ  This organ was built by Mylrea & Cartwright, Organ Builders of Park Road Works, West Green. During the First World War, the government told Philip Mylrea he had to stop crafting organs and start manufacturing ammunition boxes, as part of the war effort. Rather than degrade his skills, he refused, sold up his share of the business and opened up a greengrocers in Dunstable! : Church, Essex, Kelvedon, Hatch, St Nicholas, Organ
8 Kelvedon Hatch - Organ
Kirby-le-Soken - St Michael  Apart from the tower, this medieval church was rebuilt in 1870 by Henry Stone, who also built the church at Walton on the Naze, one of the three 'Soken' (along with Kirby)  under the independent jurisdiction of St Paul's Cathredral, which owned a huge estate in the Naze. The tower is a classic "East Anglian" design with diagonal buttresses, faced with knapped flint. The belfry contains 8 bells. : Church, Essex, Kirby, le, Soken, Kirby-le-Soken, St Michael
9 Kirby-le-Soken - St Michael
Laindon - St Nicholas - East Window  The nave of this Grade I listed building  is believed to have been built during the 13th Century. The chancel and chapel were added during the 1330's.  St. Nicholas is the Patron Saint of children, as well as merchants, sailors, pawnbrokers, apothecaries and perfumers.  There have been some notable rectors of the church over the centuries, including Dr John Pell (March 1st 1611 - December 12th 1685), who had been a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Amsterdam before taking Holy Orders. He spoke nine languages: but is remembered as the man who proposed the division sign for mathematics, still in use today : Church, Essex, Laindon, St Nicholas, Grade1, C13, C14, C15, Tudor
10 Laindon - St Nicholas - East Window
Laindon - St Nicholas  The nave of this Grade I listed building  is believed to have been built during the 13th Century. The chancel and chapel were added during the 1330's. The south porch and bell turret are 15th century. The Bell Turret is a complex structure with one tower rising inside the other so as to support  the weight of the five bells Two of the bells are 15th century and the Tenor bell dates from 1588, the year of the Spanish Armada.  The three storied, wooden annex at the western end of the church is known as the Priest's House. It was built during the late Tudor or early Stuart times and contains a (possibly unique) bread oven. Sometimes the priest's house was used as a school, housing the school master and his family and often pupils as well. The church has not changed much from the early 18th century to today, apart from the addition of an organ, and repair and restoration works. : Church, Essex, Laindon, St Nicholas, Grade1, C13, C14, C15, Tudor
11 Laindon - St Nicholas
Laindon - St Nicholas - Woodwork  There is an unusual three storied, wooden 17th century annex at the western end of the church which is known as the Priest's House. It was built during the late Tudor or early Stuart times and contains a (possibly unique) bread oven. It was used as accommodation for a priest but also as a school, housing the school master and his family and often pupils as well : Church, Essex, Laindon, St Nicholas, Grade1, C13, C14, C15, Tudor
12 Laindon - St Nicholas - Woodwork
Lamarsh - Holy Innocents  Not every Lord of the Manor (in this case Simon de Beaumont) can afford to build a castle, but a church with a round tower provided both a defensible structure (with slit windows)  and a statement of piety. The church was built c.1140 and is one of only 6 churches with round towers in Essex. The tower was badly damaged by a lightning strike in 1767 and repaired with brick, timber and plaster - all neatly hidden by the rendering. The octagonal church spire with 'fairy-tale' dormer windows is an addition by Blomfield during restoration in 1865-9. Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Lamarsh, Holy Innocents, Grade 1, Round Tower, Norman, C12
13 Lamarsh - Holy Innocents
Lamarsh - Holy Innocents - Interior  The chancel of Holy Innocents was constructed around the same time as the nave - in 1140, but was rebuilt in the 14th century. Early 16th century brickwork framing the entrance to the rood stairs and rood loft is plainly visible. The delicate oak screen of 10 bays, erected in the 15th century, was a beautiful embellishment installed when Margaret Beaufort, the mother of Henry VII, was Lady of the Manor. : Church, Essex, Lamarsh, Holy Innocents, Grade 1, Round Tower, Norman, C12, Interior
14 Lamarsh - Holy Innocents - Interior
Lambourne - St Mary and All Saints  Near Abridge, Essex - 12th century, but the chancel was almost entirely rebuilt in the 13th century . Early in the 16th century the bell turret was added. Some nice examples of Norman masonry can be seen. : Church, Essex, Lambourne, St Mary, C12, C13, C16
15 Lambourne - St Mary and All Saints
Langdon Hills - St Mary & All Saints  This pretty 16th century church is now a private residence. : Church, Essex, Langdon, Hills, St Mary, C16, Old
16 Langdon Hills - St Mary & All Saints
Langdon Hills - St Mary & All Saints  This 16th century church is located in Old Church Hill, Langdon Hills and is now a private residence, although access is permitted to the churchyard. The timber tower and broach spire were rebuilt  in 1841. : Church, Essex, Langdon, Hills, St Mary, C16, Old
17 Langdon Hills - St Mary & All Saints
Langdon Hills - St Mary  The church was built in 1876 on a man-made mound on the highest point of Hall Wood, to replace the older St Mary and All Saints at Old Church Hill.  It is made of brick with a facing of ragstone in the Early English style. : Church, Essex, Langdon, Hills, St Mary, C19, New
18 Langdon Hills - St Mary
Langford - St Giles  An altar within a circular apse was a tradition which began in Christian Syria in the 5th century.  By the 9th century, it was common in Anglo-Saxon lands for churches to have altars at both the east and west ends, as was the case at the Saxon cathedral at Canterbury. St Giles is a unique example of a circular apse accommodating this at the west end of the church. with architectural evidence of a now-missing apse at the east end. The apse, with 4 feet thick walls,  was built in Norman times and is the only surviving example of this in the country. : Church, Essex, Langford, St Giles, Norman
19 Langford - St Giles
Langham - St Mary the Virgin  This is a Grade I listed building, consisting of a chancel, nave and south aisle. Parts of the north wall of the chancel and nave are 12th century, while the lower part of the tower is 13th century. Early in the 14th century the whole church was remodelled: the chancel was extended and its arch widened asymmetrically to meet the splayed south wall. There is a magnificent modern organ built by Roger Pulham of Charsfield, Suffolk, inside the church which is worth a look. It is featured in a number of John Constable’s paintings, most notably the several versions of “The Glebe Farm and Langham Church”. : Church, Essex, Langham, St Mary, Grade 1, C13, C14
20 Langham - St Mary the Virgin
Langley - St John the Evangelist  The church is built on one of the highest points in Essex, near to the Essex/Herts border. Its origins are Norman although the tower was added during the fourteenth century and the chancel re-built in 1560. The church was restored in 1885 and this included extensive restoration of the fifteenth century double hammerbeam roof. The south doorway, and one small window in the north wall, are original features remainig from Norman times. : Church, Essex, Langley, St John, Norman, C14, C16
21 Langley - St John the Evangelist
Latchingdon - Christ Church  Built in 1856 with a nave and chancel of Kentish rag on a small plot at a road junction. It was built as the 'new' church to replace the older St Michael's parish church a mile away which fell into disrepair, since converted into a private house. : Church, Essex, Latchingdon, Christ Church, Christ
22 Latchingdon - Christ Church
Latton Priory  The Augustinian priory of St John the Baptist was founded in the 12th century, and the Priory Church stood at the northern corner of a moated island about 80 yards square. The church was completely rebuilt in the 14th century using flint rubble dressed with reused Roman brick and Reigate stone.   In 1536 the priory was dissolved, eventually passing to the Mark Hall estate in the 1550s.    The church was part of a square of cloistered buildings for the Augustinian order, including a dormitory to the south, a cellarium to the east and refectory to the south (where the farmhouse now stands). Fishponds to the south of the moat helped to feed the monks, particularly in the leaner winter months.  The original building included a three-stage tower with pyramidal roof, but by the late 18th century only the chancel, crossing, transepts, and east end of the nave remained, with the building used as a barn. Now all that survives, still incorporated in a barn, is the crossing and fragments of the abutting transepts and nave. : Church, Essex, Latton, Priory, C14
23 Latton Priory
Latton Priory (Barn)  A round clerestory window, formerly sexfoiled, now blocked, survives in the north wall of the nave.  The nave was probably built before 1300. The crossing and transepts were built early in the 14th century, by which time the chancel had a north chapel. The nave was heightened around that time, and a lean-to building was added on the north side. : Church, Essex, Latton, Priory, C14
24 Latton Priory (Barn)
Lawford - St Mary  The chancel of Lawford Church was built in the fourteenth century. It contains 8 stone-framed windows which provided a degree of internal light which was quite unusual at the time.The north east window is interesting in that it depicts people and humour, with portrayals of revellers dancing, wrestling, playing instruments and holding each other by the leg. : Church, Essex, Lawford, St Mary, C14, C16
25 Lawford - St Mary
Lawford - St Mary - Graves  This nave, chance, south porch and tower of this parish church was built in the mid 14th century althougn the tower was extensively altered in the the 16th and 17th centuries, and later. The north aisle was built in 1826. The fabric consists of flint, rubble, septaria and brick, limestone dressings. The red tiled roof has diamond patterning and pierced ridge tiles and a cross on the gable.The large east window is a 19th/20th century replacement. : Church, Essex, UK, Lawford, St Mary, C14, C16
26 Lawford - St Mary - Graves
Layer de la Haye - St John the Baptist  Although some elements of this church are Norman, most of the building dates from the fourteenth century. Today the church is beautifully positioned, at the edge of the village looking out over the Abberton reservoir. : Church, Essex, Layer de la Haye, St John, C14, Grade 1
27 Layer de la Haye - St John the Baptist
Layer de la Haye - St John - Interior  The interior of this fourteenth century church was restored in Victorian times, and is now light and airy. : Church, Essex, Layer de la Haye, St John. C14, Grade 1, Interior
28 Layer de la Haye - St John - Interior
Layer Marney - St Mary the Virgin  The Grade I listed church is adjacent to Layer Marney Tower, and was built at the same time, early in the 16th century. It is of Tudor brick construction, with stone dressing on the buttresses. The tower, south aisle, south porch and (very rare) chancel porch have battlements.   Internally the church is light and airy. The nave and chancel in the south aisle are separated by a 15th century screen: the north aisle is also separated into two sections, divided by a 16th century screen. The eastern section of the north aisle contains three magnificent monuments to members of the Marney family, while the western section contains a plough. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
29 Layer Marney - St Mary the Virgin
Layer Marney Church - 360° Panorama  Interactive VR tour inside Layer Marney Church. : Layer Marney, Layer, tudor, church, 360, panorama, tour
30 Layer Marney Church - 360° Panorama
Layer Marney - St Mary the Virgin - Interior  The chancel screen is 15th century, the pulpit is made from a mixture of 16th and 17th century wood panels. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument, Interior, Chancel, Screen
31 Layer Marney - St Mary the Virgin - Interior
Layer Marney - St Mary - Pulpit  Pulpit made from 16th and 17th century wood panels : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument, Pulpit
32 Layer Marney - St Mary - Pulpit
Layer Marney - Sir William Marney 1360  The alabaster effigy of Sir William Marney (1360) lies on an elaborate tomb chest. He is wearing bascinet, camail and a hip-belt, and has his dagger at his side. His head rests on his visor, and his feet rest on a lion. In the background is a Tudor fireplace - unusual inside a church. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
33 Layer Marney - Sir William Marney 1360
Layer Marney - Sir William Marney - Detail  Sir William Marney, d.1360 : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
34 Layer Marney - Sir William Marney - Detail
Layer Marney - St Mary - Marney Monument  The monument to Henry, 1st Lord Marney (1523). The effigy is carved from Catacleuse, a Cornish black stone, and the canopy from terracotta. The carving of the canopy is very elaborate and possibly executed by Italian craftsmen.  Henry was a Sherriff of Essex, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancster, and a Privy Councillor to Henry VIII. He became a Captain of the King's Bodyguard. He was made a Baron in 1523 and died later that year passing the title on to his son, John. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
35 Layer Marney - St Mary - Marney Monument
Layer Marney - John 2nd Lord Marney 1525  The monument to John, 2nd Lord Marney (1525).The effigy is carved from Catacleuse, a Cornish black stone. The tomb chest was carved from terracotta. The detail of the carving is very fine - see the hinges on his bracers, and the carved waistcoat and codpiece - possibly executed by Italian craftsmen.  John was an esquire to Henry VIII and knighted at Tournai. He succeeded to the peerage in 1523 but died two years later at the age of 45, leaving no male heir. He was the last of his line. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
36 Layer Marney - John 2nd Lord Marney 1525
Layer Marney - St Mary - Monument Detail  Detail of the terracotta carving above the tomb of Henry, 1st Lord Marney. : Church, Essex, Layer, Marney, St Mary, Grade 1, Tudor, C16, Monument
37 Layer Marney - St Mary - Monument Detail
Layer Marney - St Mary - Wall Painting  This 16th century wall painting shows St Christopher crossing a stream. St Christopher is turning his head to look at the Christ Child sitting on his right shoulder. Fish swim about his feet and an eel appeares to be winding around one ankle. There is a small figure painted on the left bank: an early depiction of an angler.  The painting was re-discovered in 1870 having been covered up, to protect it during the reformation. : Layer, Marney, St Mary, Church, Essex, Painting, C16
38 Layer Marney - St Mary - Wall Painting
Leaden Roding - St Michael  The nave was built late in the 11th century. In the 13th century the chancel was re-built and widened on both sides. The north wall of the nave was re-built in the 14th century. The weather-boarded bell-turret was added c. 1500 and the spire is shingled.The squat bell-turret houses three bells, one of which is reputed to be the oldest in Essex, dated 1523. The church was restored in the 19th century when the North Vestry and south porch were added and part of the south wall of the nave re-built.  They should do something about those trees. : Church, Essex, Leaden, Roding, St Michael, C13, C14
39 Leaden Roding - St Michael
Leaden Roding - St Michael - Interior  The roof of the chancel has two rough tie-beams and trussed rafters, date unknown. The nave roof is early 16th-century. The bell-turret at the west end of the nave is probably late 15th or early 16th-century. The pulpit is early 16th century.  A Holditch Organ was installed in the church in 2000. : Church, Essex, Leaden, Roding, St Michael, C13, C14, Interior
40 Leaden Roding - St Michael - Interior
Lindsell - St Mary  This extraordinary church, lying within the boundaries of Lindsell Hall, dates from at least 1154. What is immediately striking is the position of the flint tower with Elizabethan brick buttresses and parapet. On the north side is an anchorite cell. : Church, Essex, Lindsell, St Mary, C12, Anchorite, Cell
41 Lindsell - St Mary
Lindsell - St Mary - Interior  The chancel (14ft x 19ft) is framed by a flattened semi-circular arch, built in the 12th centruy. The 3 light 13th century east window contains fragments of medieval glass. To the right is a large "squint" arch which allows the altar service to be viewed from the south aisle. The 15th century font is octagonal with quatrefoils and shields. : Church, Essex, Lindsell, St Mary, C12, Anchorite, Cell, Chancel
42 Lindsell - St Mary - Interior
Lindsell - Anchorite Cell  Left - the opening to the anchorite cell from inside the chancel. Right - The anchorite cell in the north wall with a view of the altar.  Anchorites were religious recluses, often women,  who would be sealed in a tiny cell at the side of the church sanctuary with the permission of the Bishop. The practice was common between 1225 and 1400. Last rites were administered because once she took up residence, no priest could reach the hermit: the bricking up of the door was a sign that this was a choice for life. The cell had a small window to receive the sacrament and view the altar, and a small opening though which food and water could be passed. Living solitary lives of silence, prayer and mortification, they would live by means of endowment, and could provide counsel or prayer for visitors. : Church, Essex, Lindsell, St Mary, C12, Anchorite, Cell
43 Lindsell - Anchorite Cell
Liston - Dedication unknown  The nave and chancel are Norman and there is a blocked up Norman north doorway. The principal feature of the church is the early Tudor tower in diapered red and black brick with battlements and a three-light west window. An higher octagonal turret on the north east corner of the tower houses the stairs. The church is Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Liston, Norman, Tudor, Grade 1
44 Liston - Dedication unknown
Little Baddow - St Mary the Virgin  An early Norman church built from rubble with re-used Roman bricks, set on a sloping site on a hill about a mile outside the village of Little Baddow. The nave was widened around 1330 and the tower added at some time in the same century. The chancel was rebuilt in the 15th century. The church is Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Little, Baddow, St Mary, Norman, C14, Grade 1
45 Little Baddow - St Mary the Virgin
Little Baddow - Mildmay Monument  The chancel of St Mary's church contains an elaborate monument to Sir Henry Mildmay (d.1639) and his two wives. He lies clad in his armour (he distinguished himself in battle in Ireland against the Spanish) and at his feet are his two wives in kneeling position - Alicia Harris on the left and Amy Gurdon (who survived him) on the right. Alicia Harris committed suicide on account of her husband‟s unkindness; hence the skull in her hand.  In the nave there is a 1375 painting of St Christopher, and interestly, a recently uncovered 12th century drawing of the devil on the north wall. : Church, Essex, Little, Baddow, St Mary, Norman, C14, Grade 1
46 Little Baddow - Mildmay Monument
Little Bentley - St Marys  The nave and chancel have Roman brick quoins which are at the latest, Norman, but possibly Saxon. The building was extended to the east in the 13th century, with a mixture of septaria, roman tiles and rubble, fenestrated with 3 stepped lancet windows.   The tower was built in the 15th century and is is a good example of ornamental flint-and-brick construction. In the early 16th century, the south nave wall was remodelled in red brick, with the addition of a porch, leaving the line of the earlier, higher roof arch still visible on the east wall of the tower. As a result, the chancel is, unusually, higher than the nave. Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Little, Bentley, St Mary, Norman, C13, C15, Grade 1
47 Little Bentley - St Marys
Little Birch - Church Ruin  St Marys, near Colchester, is of Norman origins, with much of the north wall built during the 14th century. The upper part of the tower is Tudor. The church fell into disuse in 1598, and by 1768 was a ruin. It is still a sacred space. : Little Birch, Church, ruin
48 Little Birch - Church Ruin
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin  The nave is Norman, the chancel c.1300. The tower was added during the fifteenth century (the upper stage later re-built in brick in the 16th century) when a large nave arch was set in: the organ loft occupies a gallery within the resulting space at the base of the tower. The porch was added during the 16th cenury. The church is made of rubble with large amounts of puddingstone and occupies a fairly isolated spot surrounded by farmland. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C14, C16
49 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin  The tower was built during the 15th century, of rubble and puddingstone. The upper section was re-built during the 16th century, of brick. The church is in a fairly isolated position and the large three-light west window looks out over farmland - see note. The tower contains four bells. The two oldest are said to be the work of Robert Burford of London circa 1392-1418, meaning they are older than the tower. Their inscriptions read "Sancta Katerina Ora Pro Nobis" (Saint Catherine pray for us) and "Sit Nomen Domini Benedictom" (Blessed is the name of the Lord). The other two were cast circa 1898, by Bowell and Son of Ipswich, to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16
50 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Gallery View  Norman nave and c.1300 chancel, viewed from the organ loft. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Interior
51 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Gallery View
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Interior  The nave is Norman, the chancel, c.1300. The oak pulpit dates from the 18th century. Traces of rood stairs were found in 1885, implying that there was once a rood loft. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Interior
52 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Interior
Little Bromley - St Mary - Stained Glass  The church contains a stained glass window of Sir Christopher Wren (seen holding the plans for St Paul's Cathedral). It was donated in memory of men from the parish lost in the first world war. Below him are the arms of Wadham College, Oxford. At one time, Little Bromley was a Wadham College living and Wren was an alumnus of the College. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Window, Stained, Glass
53 Little Bromley - St Mary - Stained Glass
Little Bromley - St Mary - Stained Glass  The church contains stained glass windows of King Charles II and Archbishop William Laud. They were donated in memory of those local men lost in the first world war. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Window, Stained, Glass
54 Little Bromley - St Mary - Stained Glass
Little Bromley - St Mary - Window  The church contains stained glass windows of King Charles II and Archbishop William Laud. They were donated in memory of those local men lost in the first world war. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Window, Stained, Glass
55 Little Bromley - St Mary - Window
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin  A view across the flat fields of Essex, from the west window in the tower. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Window
56 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Font  The font is octagonal, early sixteenth century. Carved on the sides are the symbols of the four evangelists, alternating with rosettes. The carving is a quite primitive representation of  Mark as a winged lion : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Font
57 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Font
Little Bromley - St Mary's Font - Matthew  Carved on the sides of the sixteenth century octagonal font are the symbols of the four evangelists. This one depicts Matthew, the angel. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Font
58 Little Bromley - St Mary's Font - Matthew
Little Bromley - St Mary's  Font - John  Carved on the sides of the sixteenth century octagonal font are the symbols of the four evangelists. This one depicts John, the eagle. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Font
59 Little Bromley - St Mary's Font - John
Little Bromley - St Mary's Font - Luke  Carved on the sides of the sixteenth century octagonal font are the symbols of the four evangelists. This one depicts Luke, the winged ox. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Font
60 Little Bromley - St Mary's Font - Luke
Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Organ  The organ sits on a gallery inside the nave arch. It dates from 1820 and was once hand-pumped. At the apex of the nave arch is a partially covered memorial to a churchwarden, dated 1711. : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Organ
61 Little Bromley - St Mary the Virgin - Organ
Little Bromley - St Mary - Organ Pipes (Rear)  Organ pipes (1820) seen from rear : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Organ
62 Little Bromley - St Mary - Organ Pipes (Rear)
Little Bromley - St Mary - Organ Pipes  Organ pipes (1820) seen from front : Church, Essex, Little, Bromley, Norman, C13, C15, C16, Organ
63 Little Bromley - St Mary - Organ Pipes
Little Burstead - St Mary the Virgin  This small rural church has a 12th century nave with the chancel added during the fourteenth century. The original entrance was via the north door: the south door was added in the 15th century. The piscina is dated 1500 and the font, early 16th century. The walls are built of pudding stone with freestone and handmade brick dressings; this can still be seen in the north wall but the other walls were plastered over in the 1950's and 60's due to extensive weathering. The fifteenth century bell tower is timber-framed with a shingled spire. : Church, Essex, Little, Burstead, St Mary, C12, C15
64 Little Burstead - St Mary the Virgin
Little Canfield - All Saints  This odd church has been much altered over the centuries. The Norman twelfth century nave has four 14th century windows, one with two and one with four trefoiled lights. The tower arch, tower and steeple are Victorian, added in 1856 by Rev. C.L. Smith in his own unique style. The west windows and chancel are also Victorian. The north vestry and vault were added in 1795.  Internally, there is a 14th century rood screen and two 16th century brasses, but the rest of the interior is all Rev Smith's work.  The result is a building that doesn't feel quite at ease with itself. : Church, Essex, Little, Canfield, All Saints, Norman, C14, Smith
65 Little Canfield - All Saints
Little Chesterford - St Mary the Virgin  Originally built during the 13th and 14th centuries, the church was restored in 1855 when the bellcote and vestry were added. : Church, Essex, Little, Chesterford, St Mary
66 Little Chesterford - St Mary the Virgin
Little Chesterford - St Mary's Graveyard  The graveyard's neater without all those messy gravestones getting in the way of the lawnmower, don't you think. And a locked church is much easier to clean. : Church, Essex, Chesterford, St Mary
67 Little Chesterford - St Mary's Graveyard
Little Chesterford - St Mary - Mossy Grave  Mossy blanket : Church, Essex, Little, Chesterford, Grave
68 Little Chesterford - St Mary - Mossy Grave
Little Clacton - St James  The early Norman chancel and thirteenth century nave were remodelled during the fourteenth century. The wooden bell turret is fifteenth century. The porch was added late in the fourteenth century, possibly 1381. Internally, the font is late 12th century. : Church, Essex, Little, Clacton, St James, Norman, C13, C14
69 Little Clacton - St James
Little Coggeshall - St.Nicholas Chapel  St.Nicholas' was the gatehouse chapel to Coggeshall Abbey and was used by travellers or locals not normally permitted into the abbey. It is the oldest post-Roman brick building in the county, dating from the early 13th century. Like the abbey itself, it was constructed using very fine and highly unusual locally made brick. The bricks (called tiles) were made in the abbey's own kilns at Tilkey (a corruption of tile kiln), and have a distinctive almost black core.   Following the Dissolution the chapel was used as a barn/cowshed for hundreds of years. It fell into serious disrepair, but in 1896 the chapel was restored and tiles replaced the thatched roof. These days it is owned by the Diocese of Chelmsford and regular services are held there. : Church, Essex, Coggeshall, C13, Little, St Nicholas
70 Little Coggeshall - St.Nicholas Chapel
Little Dunmow - St Mary the Virgin  "Dum sumus in mundo, vivamus corde jocundo" - 'While we are in this world, we should live with a happy heart' - so runs the graffiti inside the church inscribed by a monk 600 years ago.   This church was formerly the Lady Chapel (or south chancel chapel) of a large Augustinian Priory founded in 1106 by  Lady Juga Baynard, a relation of one of William the Conqueror's feudal barons. The windows in the south wall, seen above, are alternating 3 and 4 light, each with individual tracery, carefully restored in 1988, based on the original remodelled windows of 1360.  The impressive monastic buildings stood to the southwest of the church but, along with much of the Priory, were razed to the ground after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The thin north west turret was added in 1871, a feature which Pevsner described as "silly". : Church, Essex, Dunmow, St Mary, Little
71 Little Dunmow - St Mary the Virgin
Little Easton - St Mary the Virgin  The parish church of Little Easton stands to the east of Easton Lodge. The walls are of flint rubble, with a few pieces of brick, possibly Roman, and stone dressings; the roofs are tiled. The nave was built early in the 12th century. The chancel was rebuilt and lengthened, and a south chapel added c. 1230. In the late 15th century the south chapel was rebuilt, and the west tower added. In the 19th century the church was restored, and the North Vestry and Organ-chamber were added.  On the north wall inside the church is a painting of a seated figure with a halo around his head, dated from circa 1130.  This is thought to depict an apostle: possibly even Christ.  On the south wall another painting shows scenes from the Lord's Passion.  The architectural canopies, costume and especially the armour depicted indicate 14th century work.   The alabaster tomb of Sir Henry Maynard, his wife and their 10 children is magnificent. Six of the sons are depicted holding a skull in their hands, indicating they died before their parents.   The western section of the north aisle comprises the American Chapel, a memorial to honour all the member of the United States Army Airforce's 386th Bombardment Group (M), known as 'The Crusaders' (1942-1945).   For more than a year, from September 1943, their base was Great Dunmow Airfield, in the grounds of Easton Lodge. : Church, Essex, Easton, Mary, C12, C13, C15, USAAF
72 Little Easton - St Mary the Virgin
Little Easton - Sons of Sir Henry Maynard, 1610  In St Marys, Little Easton. 5 of the 8 sons depicted carry 'Memento mori' on the tomb - indicating that they pre-deceased him and his wife Susan. : Church, Essex, Easton, Mary, C12, C13, C15, Monument, Maynard
73 Little Easton - Sons of Sir Henry Maynard, 1610
Little Hallingbury - St Mary  The nave and part of the chancel are Norman, although the chancel was lengthened in the 13th century. The porch is 14th century and shelters a Norman doorway built of Roman bricks. The 15th century single hammerbeam chancel roof is noteworthy. The half timbered bell tower and shingled spire were added during the 17th century. One of the church bells dates from c.1330 (which must make it one of the oldest church bells in the county), the others from c.1400 and 1683. In 1901 the church was struck by lightening, damaging the bell turret and the nave roof. : Church, Essex, Hallingbury, C13, C14
74 Little Hallingbury - St Mary
Little Leighs - St John the Evangelist  The nave was built in the early 12th century, and the chancel was added or rebuilt in the 13th century.  It was sensibly restored in 1895 by A Y Nutt, who rebuilt the east wall and the south porch and added the vestry.  Inside the church there is a mid-14th century recess containing an older wooden life-sized effigy of a priest whose body lies in the tomb beneath. He wears vestments and his head is supported by two angels; he has a lion and a lamb at his feet. This is the only such effigy of a priest in the country. It was made of oak (not stone, so as to be movable to make a space for the Easter Sepulchre) and would have been brightly coloured originally.   The Easter Sepulchre ceremony was abolished under the Reformation, and many of the sepulchures themselves were destroyed. But according to the Ecclesiological Society, the ceremony was broadly as follows.  On Good Friday there would be the ceremony popularly known as 'creeping to the cross', when parishoners would make their way on their knees to a cross and kiss it. This might be a cross specially kept for the purpose, or the altar cross.   Afterwards the priest and his assistants, bare-foot, would ceremonially wrap the crucifix in fine fabrics, and place this representation of the dead Christ in a 'sepulchre', together with a pyx containing the consecrated host (the wafer, which had been consecrated the previous day). The door or curtain of the sepulchre would then be shut. 'I am counted as one of them that go down into the pit' was the responsory.  From Good Friday until Easter Sunday, the Easter Sepulchre had lights burning in front of it, and was watched over day and night, possibly by lay people as well as priests. All over England on Easter Sunday morning, before mass, before the ringing of bells, but with the church all lighted, the wafer in the Easter Sepulchre was taken out with great ceremony and placed on the altar, representing the Resurrection.   The cross  was then removed and there was a procession. Mass was celebrated. At a few places there seem to have been plays. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13
75 Little Leighs - St John the Evangelist
Little Leighs - St John - Oak Priest  Recessed into the north wall of the chancel,  there lies a wooden life-sized effigy of a priest (c.1300) whose body lies in the tomb beneath. He wears vestments and his head is supported by two defaced angels; he has a lion and a lamb at his feet. This is the only such effigy of a priest in the country. It was made of oak (not stone, so as to be movable to make a space for the Easter Sepulchre) and would have been brightly coloured originally.The decorations on the ogee arch above are beautifully carved with a combination of Christian and pagan imagery. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
76 Little Leighs - St John - Oak Priest
Little Leighs - St John - Oak Priest  The wooden priest effigy in the recess could be moved to make space for the Easter Sepulchre ceremony, abolished during the reformation. This ceremony began on Good Friday with 'creeping to the cross', when parishoners would crawl towards a crucifix (representing the dead body of Christ) and kiss it.   Afterwards the priest and his assistants, bare-foot, would wrap the crucifix, and place it in a 'sepulchre', together with a pyx containing the host (consecrated communion wafer). The sepulchre would then be covered and lights placed in front. These lights would burn day and night from Good Friday until Easter Sunday all over England, and were tended constantly, by both priests and lay people.  On Easter Sunday morning, before mass, before the ringing of bells, but with the church still lighted, the wafer in the Easter Sepulchre was taken out and placed on the altar, to represent the Resurrection.   The cross  was then removed and carried in ceremonial procession, followed by mass. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
77 Little Leighs - St John - Oak Priest
Little Leighs - St John - Face of Oak Priest  Recessed into the north wall of the chancel,  there lies a wooden life-sized effigy of a priest (c.1300) whose body lies in the tomb beneath. He wears vestments and his head is supported by two defaced angels; he has a lion and a lamb at his feet. This is the only such effigy of a priest in the country. It was made of oak (not stone, so as to be movable to make a space for the Easter Sepulchre) and would have been brightly coloured originally. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
78 Little Leighs - St John - Face of Oak Priest
Little Leighs - St John: Lion Spandrell  This fourteenth century carved spandrel contains the image of a lion. Lions had many symbolic meanings, mostly to do with Christ, but also representing the power of the King, wisdom, and justice. In this case roses are growing from out of the mouth of the lion. Roses were symbols of divinity in Marian worship - so the meaning could refer to the spread of Christian obedience under the rule of the Divine King. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
79 Little Leighs - St John: Lion Spandrell
Little Leighs - St John: Sun Spandrell  This beautifully carved spandrel shows the Sun, with spreading flames, which is representative of God in many religions, especially early Celtic Christianity. For example, many early Christian symbols which contain IHS within the symbol of a flaming sun. The church is orientated to the east - where the rising sun is symbolic of Christ's return. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
80 Little Leighs - St John: Sun Spandrell
Little Leighs - St John: Green Man Spandrell  The Green Man, with ornate foliage growing from his mouth, mirrors the Lion with roses growing from its mouth. The Green Man is the old pagan symbol, often seen on fonts, representing  the power of Life, of the cyclical seasons of nature and its ability to spring forth anew. The Christian re-interpretation is one of rebirth. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
81 Little Leighs - St John: Green Man Spandrell
Little Leighs - St John: Oak Tree Spandrell  This beautiful 14th century carving shows an oak tree. The Oak is also a time-honoured pagan symbol of a pantheistic belief in a spirit which lies within all life on earth. Oak groves were considered sacred places, and many place names such as "Holy Oak" have sprung up in a merging of old pagan and new Christian beliefs. Lying opposite the symbol of the Sun - or Yahweh, I would suggest the Oak Tree carving is seen as the counter-balancing pagan interpretation of an everlasting divine entity. : Church, Essex, Little, Leighs, Norman, C13, Monument
82 Little Leighs - St John: Oak Tree Spandrell
Little Parndon - St Mary  Victorian flint church with apsidal chancel and picturesque belfry with brick nogging between the studwork. : Harlow, Little Parndon, Essex, apse, Victorian, church, belfry
83 Little Parndon - St Mary
Little Tey - St James the Less  Built around 1130, the church consists of a single cell nave and chancel with an apsidal end. The roof is believed to be early 13th century,  the tower 15th century and the porch 19th century. The roof was thatched at one time, but church records report that some tiles were blown off in 1594 so the thatch must have been replaced by tiles before that date. This tiny Grade I lised church contains a series of medieval wall paintings depicting The Passion. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
84 Little Tey - St James the Less
Little Tey - St James - Interior  This simple Norman church, built c.1130, has a chancel apse. In c.1280 a series of pictures depicting the Passion was painted around the apse. 40 years later these were overpainted with another series of passion paintings and additional paintings were added along the north and south walls. Fragments of medieval wall painting are regularly uncovered in medieval churches, but the discovery of complete narrative schemes is  unusual. In later years the entire interior was limewashed and distempered, hiding the paintings. This wash was scraped back and replaced several times from the 18th century onwards. In the 1960's the church was given a coat of emulsion. This began to flake off in the 1990's revealing fragments of the medieval pictures, and a thorough restoration was performed. Some of the paintings are in very poor condition due both to their age and the repeated scraping, but what remains is still powerfully evocative. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
85 Little Tey - St James - Interior
Little Tey - St James the Less - Organ  The pretty church organ was moved to Little Tey from Sternfield in Suffolk, in 1972. It was built by Arnold. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1, Organ
86 Little Tey - St James the Less - Organ
Little Tey - St James the Less - Doorway  Norman doorway wirh carved tympanum : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
87 Little Tey - St James the Less - Doorway
Little Tey - St James the Less - Window  The figure in the window soffit has blond hair and wears a white undershirt, with a red cloak over his shoulder. A similar, smaller figure apears on the eastern splay. These figures are possibly representations of saints or martyrs, and it is likely that all of the 12th century windows would have had similar decorations. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
88 Little Tey - St James the Less - Window
Little Tey - St James - Washing Feet  Washing of the Feet, painted on the north wall of the apse. A series of Passion pictures was painted around the apse in c.1280, then apparantly overpainted with slightly different designs around 40 years later. Individual medieval wall paintings are quite common, but a whole narrative scheme such as this is rare. The pictures have been damaged over the intervening centuries and can be hard to make out, but the figurative quality is unusually good.  In this picture, Christ is seen kneeling before St Peter, holding his foot above a raised water basin. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
89 Little Tey - St James - Washing Feet
Little Tey - St James - Last Supper  The Last Supper, c.1280. This is the first of a highly unusual series of Passion paintings around the apse of St James the Less. The figurative detail is of a very high quality, and although individual medieval wall paintings are quite common, an entire series such as this is rare.  In the Last Supper, Christ sits at the centre of the table with St John asleep on his breast and the other disciples on either side. His left hand is held out to Judas who kneels on the other side of the table with his head bent back and his arms outstretched. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
90 Little Tey - St James - Last Supper
Little Tey - St James - Crucifixion  The Crucifion, c. 1280. One of a series of wall paintings depicting The Passion. It is very unusual to have a narrative series of paintings of this period, and the figurative quality is particularly good. This painting is in the centre of the apse, to the right of the east window.   The face of Christ is very finely drawn. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
91 Little Tey - St James - Crucifixion
Little Tey - St James - Madonna & Child  Madonna and Child. This painting on the south wall of the church dates from the 14th century. It is a very fine and tender depiction of the Virgin and Child, with the Child, who is holding a orb, sitting on the hip of the crowned Virgin. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
92 Little Tey - St James - Madonna & Child
Little Tey - St James - St Christopher  The Christ Child, sitting on the shoulder of St Christopher, painted in the 14th century. This painting is on the north wall of the church. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
93 Little Tey - St James - St Christopher
Little Tey - St James the Less - 3 Princes  Detail from "The Three Living and The Three Dead", painted c.1310. A well known story in medieval times tells of three princes who go hawking. While they are out they meet three skeletons who urge them to reform thir ways by reminding the princes of their mortality.. This fragment depicts two of the three princes. The skeleton figures were lost following the enlargement of a  window in c.1320. : Church, Essex, Little, Tey, St James, Norman, C12, C13, C16, Passion, Painting, Grade 1
94 Little Tey - St James the Less - 3 Princes
Little Thurrock - St Mary the Virgin  The nave and south door are Norman, the chancel fourteenth century. The nave was lengthened westwards in 1884 when the small bell tower was built. The church was restored in 1878/9. : Church, Essex, Little, Thurrock, St Mary, Norman, C14
95 Little Thurrock - St Mary the Virgin
Little Totham - All Saints  This charming Grade I listed church has a 12th century nave and 14th century chancel. The tower was built in the 16th century by John Sammes, who lived in the adjacent Hall. There is a monument to him inside the church.  This church is unusual in that it has hardly ever had its own rector. Instead, it is run from Goldhanger, a couple of miles away. Rumour has it that at one time in the 16th century the church did have its own rector; but after a couple of years he ran off with the daughter of the local Lord. Since then, the church has stayed rector-free. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
96 Little Totham - All Saints
Little Totham -All Saints -North Door  The north door of All Saints Church has been dated to 1075 (although there are some indications that would make it even older) and it is nationally important in terms of its ironwork. It predates the church and is believed to have come from the nearby Hall during refurbishments in the early 16th century. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
97 Little Totham -All Saints -North Door
Little Totham - All Saints Belfry  The belfry is accessed by a sixteenth century brick then wooden spiral staircase, dating from 1527. There are three bells, two from the 15th century and one 17th century tenor. The oak bell frame dates from the 16th century and the bells hang from elm head stocks.  The bells are no longer rung. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman, bell, belfry
98 Little Totham - All Saints Belfry
Little Totham - All Saints Bell  Detail of the 1663 tenor bell. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman, bell
99 Little Totham - All Saints Bell
Little Totham - All Saints - Organ  This beautiful instrument is from the mid 19th century, restored in 1994. It is a chamber organ in a delicate Gothic casement. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
100 Little Totham - All Saints - Organ
Little Totham - All Saints - Doorway  The Norman south doorway is magnificently carved and dates from 1160. The door itself is also Norman, held together with hand made iron nails and metalwork, and with a large sanctuary knocker which could be grasped by those wishing to use the church as a place of refuge. : Church, Essex, Little, Totham, All Saints, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
101 Little Totham - All Saints - Doorway
Little Wakering - St Mary  The main feature of this church is the tower, built c. 1420 thanks to the generosity of the Bishop of Norwich, and has his crest - a pelican - on the west doorway. The nave and chancel are Norman but the chancel was restored in 1878. The south porch was originally built in the 15th or 16th century but was re-built as part of the Victorian restoration. : Church, Essex, Little, Wakering, St Mary, C15, Norman
102 Little Wakering - St Mary
Little Waltham - St Martin  The nave is 12th century, and the chancel 14th or 15th century. The tower was added or re-built in the early 15th century, and repaired with red bricks two centuries later, when the buttresses were added.The south porch is 16th century. The weather vane is dated 1679.  There is a dug-out chest in the nave made from a piece of sycamore, which is 13th century. : Church, Essex, Little, Waltham, St Martin, C12, C15
103 Little Waltham - St Martin
Little Waltham - John Maltoun 1447  Memoril brass inside St Martins, Little Waltham - John Maltoun 1447. The brass is on the floor in front of the altar. : Church, Essex, Little, Waltham, St Martin, C12, C15
104 Little Waltham - John Maltoun 1447
Little Warley - St Peter  St Peter's is an interesting little church just south of the noisy A127. The earliest part of the church is the 15th century stone-built nave with traceried windows. Tudor brickwork, shored up with multiple buttresses, forms the chancel. At the west end, the red and black brick tower dates from 1718. It is in need of maintenance: not helped by allowing trees to flourish so close to the tower and the 500 year old timbered porch. Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Little, Warley, St Peter, C15, Tudor, C18, Grade 1
105 Little Warley - St Peter
Little Warley - St Peter - North Wall  The north wall displays a patchwork of differently styled attempts to keep the building going. The Perpendicular stone window is bisected and filled in by the Victorian brickwork. The early 16th century chancel has had a succession of buttresses added to it, each in a different style in an effort to stop it collapsing. The tower itself is a 1718 rebuild on an earlier stone base.  The building is still going, although it clearly needs maintenance. The problem is the people have lost interest - a once a month Evensong service in the lovely Elizabethan box-pews is only just keeping the church in the status of "used". : Church, Essex, Little, Warley, St Peter, C15, Tudor, C18, Grade 1
106 Little Warley - St Peter - North Wall
Little Warley - St Peter after 2016 repairs  The tower dated 1718 was repaired in 2016 with a £46,300 government grant. The alders and holly bush boring their roots into the foundations have been cut down, but it is not known if they present further threats to the Grade I structure. : Church, Warley, Little Warley, A127, Essex, Grade I, C15
107 Little Warley - St Peter after 2016 repairs
Little Warley Strutt Monument  In the nave -a double marble and alabaster monument to the owner of Little Warley Manor Sir Denner Strutt (d. 1661) and his first wife Mary (Staresmore, d. 1641). Mary lies on an altar-tomb, revealed by two cherubs drawing back a canopy; on a lower stage, probably added later, Sir Denner lies in plate-armour. It is interesting to see how this monument - a significant investment of skill and resources - is now crowded out by the organ, amongst Elizabethan box-pews in what has become internally a delapidated, austere and rather shoddy church. : Little Warly, Church, Essex, St Peter, marble
108 Little Warley Strutt Monument
Little Yeldham - St John the Baptist  This unassuming little church is on the site of a church mentioned in 1090 - the current nave is dated to c 1380 -1400. The belfry is 15th century, and rests on four timber posts which can be seen inside the nave.  The 15th century chancel is, unusually, out of alignment with the nave - its axis deflected towards the north. The chancel is divided from the nave by a stone screen installed by the rector JP Seddon in 1891. : Church, Essex, Little, Yeldham, St John, C14, C15
109 Little Yeldham - St John the Baptist
Little Yeldham - St John -15th C belfry timbers  At the west end of the nave,  15th century timber posts support cross-beams with arched braces, bearing the weight of the timber belfry, and its two bells said to be by Miles Graye, 1674 : Church, Essex, Little, Yeldham, St John, C14, C15
110 Little Yeldham - St John -15th C belfry timbers
Little Yeldham - St John - Font  The  15th-century font is octagonal, with cusped panels enclosing a de Vere mullet (5-pointed star), roses, blank shields, and a four-leaf flower. : Church, Essex, Little, Yeldham, St John, C14, C15
111 Little Yeldham - St John - Font
Little Yeldham - St John - Stone Coffin Lid  Leaning against the south wall of nave, by the porch, is an early 13th century coffin lid. It is coped slab with beaded edge, and cross formy with plain scroll arms springing from the middle of the stem. : Church, Essex, Little, Yeldham, St John, C14, C15
112 Little Yeldham - St John - Stone Coffin Lid
Littlebury - Holy Trinity  The nave and south arcade are early thirteenth century, with a tower added in the 14th century. The Tudor porch was added when the area became wealthy as a result of the wool trade. Extensive restoration in the 1870's included building a new chancel, replacing all the windows (except those in the tower), raising the roof and inserting the clerestory windows. Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1
113 Littlebury - Holy Trinity
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Chancel  The chancel was completely rebuilt in a restoration of 1874. The carving of the reredos, pulpit, and the pillars and arch of the chancel are of a very high quality. On either side of the chancel arch are carved heads: these represent the then Bishop of London and Queen Victoria. The imposing wall painting over the chancel arch representing the crucifixion is by  Rev. Wix, vicar from 1840 to 1889. It was completed in around 1879 as a memorial to his wife. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1, Chancel
114 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Chancel
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Chancel Arch  The quality of workmanship on the chancel arch is particularly high. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1
115 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Chancel Arch
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - South Aisle  South aisle and chapel. The east bay of the south aisle was built in 1250 as a transept, then the aisle was extended westwards during the 14th century when the tower was built: but almost nothing remains of the original features. The church was extensively restored in c.1874, when new windows were inserted. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1
116 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - South Aisle
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Font  Inside this grand church almost nothing remains of its medieval past, except the plain, square, thirteenth century font. Even this has been encased in an elaborate early 16th century wooden case with linenfold panelling and a pyramidal canopy. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1, Font
117 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Font
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Font Base  Inside the elaborate wooden casing lies a simple, square  stone font dating from the thirteenth century. And a piece of string. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1, Font
118 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Font Base
Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Doorway  The south doorway is c.1200 and has unusual waterleaf carved capitals, two orders of columns and two roll mouldings. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Holy Trinity, C13, C14, Grade 1
119 Littlebury - Holy Trinity - Doorway
Littlebury Green - St Peters  A 'Tin Tabernacle', built in 1885. The interior is wood lined. : Church, Essex, Littlebury, Green, St Peters, Tin, Tabernacle, C19
120 Littlebury Green - St Peters
Loughton - St John the Baptist  Built 1846 in neo-Norman style (hence the central tower), and designed by Sydney Smirke in yellow brick with stone dressings. : Church, Essex, Loughton, St John, C19
121 Loughton - St John the Baptist
Loves Green (Highwood) - St Pauls  St Paul's was built in 1840-42 by Steven Webb of Moulsham, originlally as a chapel of ease for Writtle. It was formally separated fron the main parish in 1875. The east end was remodelled in 1890-1. : Church, Essex, Loves, Green, Highwood, St Pauls
122 Loves Green (Highwood) - St Pauls