Magdalen Laver - St Mary  The parish church of St Mary Magdalen consists of a nave, chancel, west tower, and south porch, with walls of flint rubble and Roman brick and a wooden tower.   The nave was built early in the 12th century. The flints are set in herring-bone courses in the lower part of the walls, with Roman brick was arranged in decorative bands above. It is possible that the west doorway is also original. The thirteenth century chancel is slightly narrower than the nave but there is no chancel arch. The roof of the nave is 15th century and may at some time have incorporated a bell turret.  The timber bell tower beyond the west wall of the nave was added in the middle of the sixteenth century. The exterior of the bellfry is weather-boarded. By 1709 these boards were clearly wearing out (should have used more Ronseal - it does what it says on the tin) and in April 1709 it was decided that 'the north side of the belfry shall be new boarded with oak boards'. The old boards were to be used for patching the other sides.There are two bells, one is probably early 14th century and the other is dated 1567.  Outside the church immediately west of the south porch is an ornate marble altar tomb of William Cole, lord of the manor, who died on 1 February 1730. Cole had the tomb built before his death. The inscription is on a central panel, flanked by the figures of cherubs. The tomb is enclosed by a heavy iron railing, also ordered by Cole, and there is an achievement of arms on the wall above. : Church, Essex, Magdalen, Laver, St Mary, Norman, C12: C13, C16
1 Magdalen Laver - St Mary
Magdalen Laver - St Mary - Interior  Inside the church there is a 14th-century oak rood-screen consisting of a central doorway with four bays flanking it on each side. The screen was reconstructed in the 17th century; part of the base panelling is of this date. The doors and several of the shafts are replacements.  Most of the windows in the church as well as the two south doorways appear to have been inserted at different times during the 14th century. In the two easternmost windows of the nave there is some 14th or 15th-century glass. Similar glass in one of the chancel windows has been reset. However the east window of the chancel is largely modern (although in 14th century style) but with original carved head-stops. The south doorway to the nave and the door itself may be late-14th century. A damaged 15th-century octagonal font, which stood for a time in the rectory garden, was restored to the church early in the 20th century.  In the latter half of the 19th century extensive restoration work was carried out internally and in 1912 a second-hand pipe organ from Christ Church, Albany Street, London was installed.  The chancel roof, which has been restored, has two original tie-beams. On one of the ties is a nearly illegible inscription 'IT ANNO DOM. 1615 H. L.' : Church, Essex, Magdalen, Laver, St Mary, Norman, C12: C13, C16
2 Magdalen Laver - St Mary - Interior
Maldon - All Saints  A unique 13th century triangular tower with shingled spire and three spirelets. It had to be triangular to fit between the pre-1728 version of the nave and the old fish market in Silver Street. : Church, Essex, Maldon, All Saints, Tower, C13
3 Maldon - All Saints
Maldon - All Saints - Blind Arcade  The south aisle was added in 1330 and with it the intricate elaborate carving of this blind arcade. : Church, Essex, Maldon, All Saints, Tower, C13, blind, arcade
4 Maldon - All Saints - Blind Arcade
Maldon - All Saints - Triangular Belfry  The triangular belfry holds eight bells. : Church, Essex, Maldon, All Saints, Tower, C13
5 Maldon - All Saints - Triangular Belfry
Maldon - St Mary the Virgin  Traditionally known as the Fisherman's Church, St Mary's is located in the port area of Maldon, on The Hythe. There is evidence of ealier timber buildings here from the 7th century which probably fulfilled the same function as the church did in later times: that of beacon to shipping, but also defensive lookout for invaders. The nave was built  c.1130 in the reign of Henry I.   The original tower of St Mary's was built around 1300, and during the medieval period a beacon fire was lit atop the tower to guide ships on the Blackwater. So important was the tower to local navigation that when it collapsed in 1605 the townsfolk petitioned King James I to rebuild it, but the rebuilding was not complete until 1636. In 1740 the octagonal turret and shingled spire was added, and this still serves as an aid to navigation on the river. : Church, Essex, Maldon, St Mary, C12, C14
6 Maldon - St Mary the Virgin
Maldon - St Mary - Interior  Most of the visible interior dates from the 13th century. Medieval niches in the north wall were discovered in the 1885/7 restoration, and now contain statues of the Virgin Mary, and of St George. Rood stairs would have led to a rood loft, later destroyed in the Reformation. The current rood crucifix on the chancel arch (covered up by the banner in the photo above) was rescued from Plaistow Church upon its closure. Opposite is the Jacobean pulpit which came from the redundant church in Mashbury  in 1990.  The roof was replaced during the Victorian renovations and now rests on massive Baltic timbers. At the same time, the south aisle was built. More recently, a striking coloured glass window was installed in the south aisle to mark the millenial anniversary of the Battle of Maldon (991 AD). It interprets the prayer offered up by the Saxon leader Byrhtnoth as he lay dying on the battlefield.  "Geþancie þe, ðeoda waldend, ealra þæra wynna þe ic on worulde gebad. Nu ic ah, milde metod, mæste þearfe þæt þu minum gaste godes geunne, þæt min sawul to ðe siðian mote on þin geweald, þeoden engla, mid friþe ferian. Ic eom frymdi to þe þæt hi helsceaðan hynan ne moton.” : Church, Essex, Maldon, St Mary, C12, C14
7 Maldon - St Mary - Interior
Maldon - St Mary's Roof Angels  The roof timbers of the South Aisle have been decorated with painted and gilded angels. These were brought from St Andrews Church, Plaistow in east London when it closed. There are three similar angels from Plaistow mounted on the Chancel roof timbers. There are now no angels left in Plaistow. : Church, Essex, Maldon, St Mary, C12, C14, Angels, Roof
8 Maldon - St Mary's Roof Angels
Maldon - St Mary - Rood Stairs  Set into the thickness of the wall are early 16th century rood stairs, with the original medieval heraldic tiles at the base. : Church, Essex, Maldon, St Mary, C12, C14, Rood, Stairs
9 Maldon - St Mary - Rood Stairs
Maldon - St Peter  Standing at the top of Market Hill, the flint tower is all that remains of what was once St Peter's Church. The rest of the church was rebuilt in 1704 to create a library, and now houses the Maeldune Heritage Centre. "Maeldune" is the Saxon spelling of Maldon and means "a cross on the hill". : Church, Essex, Maldon, St Peter
10 Maldon - St Peter
Manuden - St Mary the Virgin  The church is probably Norman in origin but was largely demolished in 1863 and rebuilt in 1864. The walls are of flint rubble wall with stone dressings. The west tower has diagonal buttresses and a castellated parapet.  The framed list near the south entrance records the name of forty incumbents. Thomas Bagley - 1431 was burnt at the stake in Smithfield for heresy. Henry Grindle 1913-1928 was "tin-kettled" - a form of ostracism designed to drive him out of the parish when he married too soon (according to parishioners) after his wife's death. The following is an account from a contemporary newspaper:  VILLAGE 'RAG' ON VICAR.  OBJECTIONS TO HIS MARRIAGE.  Outside the vicarage of Manuden, Essex, recently was posted a 'picket' of youths, who have been making demonstrations of hostility against the vicar, the Rev. H. B. Grindle, because within a month of his wife's death he married the nurse who had been in attendance during his wife's last illness (says the 'Westminster Gazette'). At the last demonstration a crowd of 300 made a terrific noise with petrol cans, sheet iron and a bugle.  ''We are going to carry on every second night, from 10 p.m. until 10.30," said the leader of the 'picket,' "in order to try to move them out of the village." Mrs. Grindle, a comparatively young woman, with dark hair coiled over her ear, interviewed at the vicarage, said: "My husband's first wife died on April 29, and we were married in a Kensington church on May 25. Mr. Grindle's relatives are all pleased at our marriage. We have known each other for some months. The reason for our marriage was simple. My husband's income from the church is so small that he could not afford to stay away and appoint someone to take his place. We married at once because he could not positively come back and live alone. His wife and he had lived devotedly and happily here, and the surroundings would have been very painful to come back to alone, for there is no family. He would gladly have stayed away it he could have afforded it. When we returned there was a demonstration, and panes of glass were broken by stones. Many of the village people are quite nice to us, and I think that those who are demonstrating are mostly irresponsible young people and others who have nothing to do with the church. My husband is ill, and feeling the strain." : Church, Essex, Manuden, St Mary, Grindle
11 Manuden - St Mary the Virgin
Manuden - St Mary - Interior  Although the church was largely rebuilt in 1863 this lovely chancel screen somehow survived. It dates from the 15th century. : Church, Essex, Manuden, St Mary, Grindle
12 Manuden - St Mary - Interior
Margaret Roding - St Margaret of Antioch  This charming Parish Church is a Grade I listed building. The walls are made of flint-rubble with dressings of limestone and clunch; the roofs are covered with slates. The nave was built late in the 12th century. Late in the 14th century the chancel was re-built and shortly after the chancel-arch was re-built and enlarged. The church was restored in the 19th century when the north vestry was added and the bell-cote added or re-built.The Norman doorway and lancet windows to either side, are in good condition. : Church, Essex, Margaret, Roding, Antioch, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
13 Margaret Roding - St Margaret of Antioch
Margaret Roding - St Margaret - Norman Doorway  The Norman doorway of St  Margaret of Antioch.  The door itself is 19th century, but the restored ironwork, with hatched surface and foliated ends, is  c.1200 : Church, Essex, Margaret, Roding, Antioch, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
14 Margaret Roding - St Margaret - Norman Doorway
Margaret Roding - St Margaret - Stonemasonry  Detail of Norman decorative stonework and lancet window : Church, Essex, Margaret, Roding, Antioch, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman
15 Margaret Roding - St Margaret - Stonemasonry
Margaret Roding St Margaret - Norman Ironwork  Sanctuary Ring c.1200 showing decorative hatching.  In 511 AD, at the  Council of Orleans, sanctuary was granted to anyone who took refuge in a church - thieves, adulterers or even murderers. If the suspect could reach the church (it was not necessary to enter, touching a sanctuary ring was sufficient)  they were then able to seek the protection of the church authorities. They would have to make a full confession and then were given time to choose between two options: to stand trial, or to admit their guilt publicly and go into exile. Anyone who returned could be executed by the law and/or excommunicated by the Church.  The system was abolished by James I in 1623. : Church, Essex, Margaret, Roding, Antioch, Grade 1, C12, C14, Norman, Sanctuary, Ring, Door
16 Margaret Roding St Margaret - Norman Ironwork
Margaretting- St Margaret of Antioch  Margaretting Church was originally Norman incorporating Roman tiles, but the church was almost completely rebuilt in the early-mid 15th century when the timber-framed, weatherboarded and shingled tower with spire was added. The roofs to the nave, chancel and aisle are tiled. The chancel was altered in the 16th century and substantial restoration work took place in 1869-70, at which time the east wall was rebuilt and the spire renewed.   Further large scale work was completed in 1930 -31 when the pipe organ (dated 1881) was moved from the south aisle and sited above the entrance to the vestry, and the four pre-reformation bells tuned and re-hung. (A new bell was cast at the ‘Whitechapel Bell Foundry’ in London to join the others, in 1996). The roof was also replaced and the tower and spire re-shingled at this time. According to the vicar of the time, the architect retained as much of the old church as was possible.  The church is dedicated to St Margaret of Antioch in Pisidia. : Church, Essex, Margaretting, St Margaret, Antioch, C15, C16
17 Margaretting- St Margaret of Antioch
Marks Tey - St Andrew  St Andrew's is Grade I listed. The nave is Norman, and the original north and south doorway and one Norman window still remain. The chancel was added during the 14th century and the porch during the 15th century. The top of the tower was damaged during the Civil War and replaced with weatherboarding. : Church, Essex, Marks, Tey, St Andrew, Grade 1, Norman, C14, C15
18 Marks Tey - St Andrew
Marks Tey - St Andrew - Interior  This church has a Norman nave, the chancel was added during the 14th century. The church was thoroughly restored in 1884/5. The east window glasswork is by F.C.Eden, 1925. : Church, Essex, Marks, Tey, St Andrew, Grade 1, Norman, C14, C15
19 Marks Tey - St Andrew - Interior
Marks Tey - St Andrews - Oak Font  This 15th century octagonal font is unusual in that it is made of oak. The tracery panels on the stem have roses in the centre, the panels on the bowl formerly contained seated figures. : Church, Essex, Marks, Tey, St Andrew, Grade 1, Norman, C14, C15, Font
20 Marks Tey - St Andrews - Oak Font
Mashbury - Unknown Dedication  A small, simple church which dates from the mid 12th century. The bell turret was added in the 19th century The north and south doorways are original although the south porch is 16th century. The church was struck by lightning in 1872 and restored in 1873.  Inside is a 15th century church chest and there are fragments of 14th, 15th and early 16th century glass in the windows. The church has been redundant since the early 1980's. When we visited there was some repair work in progress on the bell turret and internally to the window arches. The church became redundant in the 1980's. : Church, Essex, Mashbury, Unknown, C12
21 Mashbury - Unknown Dedication
Mashbury - Unknown Dedication - North Door  Original twelfth century Norman doorway and lancet window : Church, Essex, Mashbury, Unknown, C12, Norman
22 Mashbury - Unknown Dedication - North Door
Mashbury - South Door  Detail of the Norman south doorway, inside a sixteenth century porch. : Church, Essex, Mashbury, Unknown, C12, Norman, Doorway
23 Mashbury - South Door
Matching - St Mary  This parish church dates from the 13th century with the south aisle widened during the 14th century and the tower added in the 15th century. The church was enlarged and features such as the south transept, organ chamber, north aisle and south porch added in 1875 but despite this many original  attributes remain intact.    In 1274 it was ordained that the vicar of Matching should receive tithes from local farmers as part of his stipend; by 1710 the small tithes were, by custom and practice, paid in cheese.  It is worth taking a moment to visit Matching village, a few yards to the west of the church, because Matching is unique. It has hardly changed since the 18th Century, and as such is a simple reminder of times long gone. The village consists of the Church, and a handful of unostentatious buildings scattered around a green. Many of these buildings date from the 15th and 16th century, including the Marriage Feast Room, built c.1480 "for the entertainment of poor people on their wedding day" (Morant 1768), which was originally built as two halls to the west of the church and has been used as a school and as an almshouse in the past. : Church, Essex, Matching, St Mary, C13, C14, C15
24 Matching - St Mary
Matching - St Mary - Chancel Ceiling  The iconography of the ceiling is interesting - reminiscent of Freemasonry symbolism. The ceiling is panelled with 36 squares. 24 squares have a quatrefoil decoration containing alternate decorations of an olive branch (symbolic of peace) and a crown over a thornless rose (symbolic of the Virgin as Queen of Heaven). Twelve squares over the altar are symbolic of Christ's crucifiction, showing: a crown of thorns, a robe, 3 nails and crossed swords, a ladder, pincers and hammer, the sun and moon, pillar and flail, dagger and lantern, and various monograms. The monogram of PAX means peace and IHS and INRI refer to Jesus of Nazareth. The 12 squares also refers to the number of apostles. : St Mary, Church, Essex, Matching, C13, C14
25 Matching - St Mary - Chancel Ceiling
Mayland - St Barnabas and Wind Turbine  Two Religions represented on the top of Mayland Hill, overlooking the River Blackwater.  One monument was built in 1867 and will last another 200 years at least. The other was built in 2011 and will last 20 years : Church, Essex, Mayland, St Barnabas, Wind, Turbine, C19
26 Mayland - St Barnabas and Wind Turbine
Messing - All Saints  The chancel is 13th century and the nave 14th century. Both are built out of stone, rubble and Roman bricks. The interior of the church was extensively remodelled in the 19th century at which time all the windows were replaced albeit in medieval style. The tower was built in around 1840 and has 3 tiers, built of red brick with stone dressings and buttresses. The south chapel and vestry are of red brick, with red plain tile roof, circa 1840. The roof of the nave is 15th century.  Messing is the familial home of 2 US Presidents: Reynold Bush left Messing in 1631 for the New World; and his decendants include George and George W. Bush. : Church, Essex, Messing, All Saints, C13, C14
27 Messing - All Saints
Messing - All Saints interior  Parts of this beautiful church date from the 14th century; in particular the roof of the nave has been there since 1360. The roof can be dated by the carved heraldry held by angels bearing the arms of the Baynard family. There are carved roses at the apex of the main trusses. The 2 hammer beams at the chancel arch have lost their angel heads probably during the Reformation, or during the English Civil War. The 2 most western roof bays belong to the 1840 restoration.  The most remarkable feature inside the church is the enamelled glass east window. It was created by Abraham van Linge in 1628 and represents acts of mercy shown to those who were sick, hungry, thirsty, naked, a stranger or in prison (Matthew 25:36). Most stained glass of that era was destroyed by the parliamentarians during the English Civil War, but in Messing, in a characteristically bold action, the villagers removed the window, placed it in the church chest and hid it in the vaults. The 14th century dug out chest is also visible in the church, on the south side, near the transept. : Church, Essex, Messing, All Saints, C13, C14, Hammerbeam, Arcade, Van Linge, Linge
28 Messing - All Saints interior
Messing - All Saints - East Window  This window was created by Abraham van Linge in 1628 and represents acts of mercy shown to those who were sick, hungry, thirsty, naked, a stranger or in prison (Matthew 25:36). During the English Civil War and the siege of Colchester, 1648, the window was carefully removed and placed in the Church's great chest, together with other church treasures, and hidden in the church’s vault, thus preserving it from destruction. : Church, Essex, Messing, All Saints, C13, C14, Stained, Glass, Van Linge, Linge
29 Messing - All Saints - East Window
Middleton - All Saints  The nave and chancel were built in the 12th century, but the latter was extended during the 13th century. Unfortunately the external walls are rendered.  The Tudor porch leads to a medieval panelled door surrounded by Norman masonry, with even more impressive Norman chancel arch inside. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Tudor
30 Middleton - All Saints
Middleton - All Saints - Chancel Arch  The fine Norman arch has multiple layers of concentric zig-zags. The polygonal shafts have a rare triangular form of decoration, and the tops of the columns are joined to abaci which extend to both nave walls. There is an elegant 13th century triple-light window at the east end of the chancel. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Tudor, Chancel, Arch
31 Middleton - All Saints - Chancel Arch
Middleton - All Saints: Chancel Arch Detail  Detail of the carving on Middleton All Saints church chancel arch. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Tudor, Chancel, Arch
32 Middleton - All Saints: Chancel Arch Detail
Middleton - All Saints: Inset  This well preserved Norman arch with two orders of zig-zags crowns the medieval panelled south door. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Tudor, Doorway
33 Middleton - All Saints: Inset
Middleton - All Saints: Door  The south entrance is a fine example of a Norman arch with two orders of zig-zags crowning a medieval panelled door. On the right hand side of the east colonette framing the door there are some incribed lines radiating down from holes drilled into the stone. These are Mass Dials. In an age without clocks, and before the 16th century porch was built, a straw inserted into the hole would cast a shadow to tell whether or not they were in time for Mass. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Tudor, Doorway
34 Middleton - All Saints: Door
Middleton - All Saints - Mass Dial  On the right hand side of the east colonette framing the door there are some incribed lines radiating down from holes drilled into the stone. These are Mass Dials. In an age without clocks, and before the 16th century porch was built, a straw inserted into the hole would cast a shadow to tell whether or not they were in time for Mass. : Church, Essex, Middleton, All Saints, C12, Norman, C13, Doorway, Tudor, Sundial
35 Middleton - All Saints - Mass Dial
Mistley - St Mary the Virgin  Two porticoed Classical towers, which stood at each end of a grandiose but highly unconventional Georgian church, designed by Robert Adam in 1776. : Church, Essex, Mistley, St Mary, Robert, Adam, Georgian
36 Mistley - St Mary the Virgin
Moreton - St Mary  The parish church of St Mary the Virgin consists of a nave and chancel built in the early 13th century, a tower built in the 16th or 17th century, the 18th century wooden south porch, and a north vestry probably built in the 19th century at the same time as extensive restorations of the church interior were carried out. In 1786 part of the tower fell in a gale. It was rebuilt in 1787 'upon the model of the old'. It is of red brick, in three stages, and has a castellated parapet and a short shingled spire. The doorway into the nave was built at the same time. : Moreton, Church, Essex, C13, C15, C18
37 Moreton - St Mary
Moreton - St Mary Interior  The mid C13 Chancel, has 3 lancet windows in east wall: two of the C13 and one of 1868. The two-light window near the east end of the nave on the south side is like the wooden west window of the tower dated late C18. There is n o structural divsion bewteen the early C13 nave and mid-C13 chancel. : Moreton, Church, C13
38 Moreton - St Mary Interior
Moreton - St Mary - Font  An earlier church had existed on this site since the late 12th century but nothing remains of this except the font, made from Purbeck marble. It consists of a square bowl standing on a circular base, which has four detached shafts. Two sides of the bowl are ornamented with fleur-de-lis, one has roundheaded arcading, and the fourth a crescent, disk, and spiral. The surface is much decayed and the carving incomplete. : Purbeck, font, C12
39 Moreton - St Mary - Font
Mount Bures - St John the Baptist  There is a plain Norman doorway in the north wall, also a Norman window to the left of the doorway with Roman brick dressings. : Church, Essex, Mount, Bures, St John, Norman, Grade 1
40 Mount Bures - St John the Baptist
Mount Bures - St John the Baptist  The central crossing tower was rebuilt in 1875 when the two short transepts were added, but otherwise the Grade I listed church is Norman. It was built a hundred yards south of a Norman motte and bailey castle, of which the mound survives and is publicly accessible. : Church, Essex, Mount, Bures, St John, Norman, Grade 1
41 Mount Bures - St John the Baptist
Mount Bures - St John - Interior  Beneath the crossing tower, rebuilt in 1875. : Church, Essex, Mount, Bures, St John, Norman, Grade 1, Interior
42 Mount Bures - St John - Interior
Mountnessing - St Giles  This striking Grade I listed church was originally built in the late 11th century but has been altered and restored many times since then. The west wall shown here was built in 1653. The north and south aisles were originally built during the 13th century, but were re-built in 1889 when the south porch was also built.  The S-cramps are to secure the massive timbers of the bellfry. : Church, Essex, Mountnessing, St Giles, Grade 1, C17, C19
43 Mountnessing - St Giles
Mundon - St Mary's  St Mary's was under restoration when this picture was taken.  The church is built within the moat of Mundon Hall. The oldest feature remaining in the stone nave is the 14th century north-west window, although the font, which has been removed,  has been dated to c.1200.The timber belfry is Tudor, erected in the early 16th century. The north porch which has carved wooden spandrels, was erected at around the same time. After that the church was not well looked after and had fallen into disrepair by 1684. It was rebuilt in the early 18th century using brick on the original foundations. It is believed that much of the interior - the box pews and the painted texts - date from this restoration, although faint traces of medieval murals showing a king and a devil have been discovered recently.  The church is now in the care of the Friends of Friendless Churches. Their extensive restoration has now been completed and the church is once again open. : Church, Essex, Mundon, St Mary, C14, C16, C17
44 Mundon - St Mary's
Mundon - St Mary before restoration  Painted texts on the walls and the rafters are believed to date from an earlier restoration, carried out in the early 18th century. The trompe l'oeil you can just see in the background - showing tassels and a bunched curtain being drawn away from the window - dates from the same period and is an unusual, rural attempt at this artform.  The church is now in the care of the Friends of Friendless Churches. : Church, Essex, Mundon, St Mary, C14, C16, C17
45 Mundon - St Mary before restoration
Mundon - St Mary Interior  St Mary's retains a complete set of 18th century box pews and an 18th century brick chancel with distinctive wooden tracery to its north and east windows. This picture was taken before the 2011 restoration. On the east wall is a nave mural showing tassels and bunched curtains being drawn aside from the window in a rare rural attempt at trompe l'oeil. The tower is unusual in having aisles to three sides.  The church is now in the care of the Friends of Friendless Churches. : Church, Essex, Mundon, St Mary, C14, C16, C17
46 Mundon - St Mary Interior
Navestock - St Thomas  The church of St Thomas the Apostle consists of nave, chancel, south aisle, and western belfry with spire.The church dates from the 11th or 12th century but was largely rebuilt in the 13th and 14th centuries.The belfry was originally believed to have been added in the 15th century but radiocarbon tests and structural evidence show that it was built in the 13th century, probably c1250 or earlier. In 1940 the church was badly damaged by a German parachute mine. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Navestock, St Thomas, C13, C14, C15
47 Navestock - St Thomas
Navestock - St Thomas (Interior)  In post-medieval times, probably in the early 19th century, alterations were made inside the church and the oak pier and arches put in the south arcade. This pier is roughly cut to a polygonal shape. The wooden arches springing from it are rough and plain and the whole has been covered with plaster to resemble the rest of the arcade. There are similar wooden arches across the nave and aisle at this point springing from semicircular responds.The windows of the chancel retain some of their medieval exterior iron grilles with barbed terminals, most complete on the east window. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Navestock, St Thomas, Oak Arcade, Interior
48 Navestock - St Thomas (Interior)
Nazeing - All Saints  This church was once owned by King Harold, and later given to the monks of Waltham Abbey. From the outside, the striking early C16 tower, with blue diapering decorating the bright red brickwork is probably the best feature of the church. The chancel, north aisle and timber porch are 15th century, the porch floor being made of tiles set on end. The nave is Norman made from flint rubble, partly rendered. : church, architecture, Nazeing, Essex, Norman, Tudor
49 Nazeing - All Saints
Nevendon - St Peters  Stone church, heavily restored in 1875, but 15th century tie-beams and 14th century door arches remain : Architecture, Church, Essex, Nevendon, St Peters
50 Nevendon - St Peters
Newport - St Mary the Virgin  Built on the site of a former Saxon church, the present church was built in the early 13th century, with chancel, nave and transepts giving it a cruciform shape. The tower was completelt rebuilt in 1859, during a general refurbishment,  as the former 15th century tower had been struck by lightning and was dangerously cracked. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Newport, St Mary, C13
51 Newport - St Mary the Virgin
Newport - Angel - late C15  One of the 15th century roof angels watching over the congregation in St Mary's nave. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Newport, St Mary, C13, C15, Roof Angel, Angel
52 Newport - Angel - late C15
Newport Chest  The south transept of St Mary's Newport contains a late 13th century portable altar known as the Newport Chest. A false bottom conceals a secret compartment. The lid is raised to form a reredos and the panel depicts from left to right, St Peter, the Virgin Mary, the Crucifixion, St John and St Paul. These are some of the earliest known oil paintings on wood. The exterior decorations suggest a Byzantium influence - the chest may have served in the Crusades. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Newport, St Mary, C13, Chest, Crusades
53 Newport Chest
Newport - St Katerina  The west wall of the north transept of St Mary's, Newport, contains two 13th century windows. Above is 14th century stained glass depicting St Katherine holding a spiked chariot wheel. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Newport, St Mary, C13, Stained Glass, Window, St Katherine, C14
54 Newport - St Katerina
Noak Hill - St Thomas  St Thomas Church at Noak Hill was built in 1841 as a Chapel of Ease at the behest of Lady Frances Neave of Dagnam Park, as a closer place of worship for herself and household. Her husband was Sir Thomas Neave, Governor of the Bank of England, whose family had owned land in the area since 1788. Although the church is relatively modern, it does contain some 15th century brasses and some glass in the windows dates from the 16th and 17th centuries. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Noak Hill, St Thomas
55 Noak Hill - St Thomas
North Benfleet - All Saints - Interior  Now an Orthodox church. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Benfleet, All Saints, Orthodox
56 North Benfleet - All Saints - Interior
North Benfleet - All Saints  All Saints stands near the site of an old moated hall,  long since demolished. Parts of it are Norman, while others are Tudor. The brick tower, built 1903, encloses the heavy 15th century timbered belfry, and is in need of major repair, but the church was declared redundant to the Church of England in 1996. Despite the holes in the roof, the church is now being used by a very friendly group from the Orthodox Community. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Benfleet, All Saints, Orthodox
57 North Benfleet - All Saints
North End - Black Chapel  Timber framed late medieval wayside chapel near Ford End, Essex, with attached priest's house.  This building has been a local landmark since at least 1347. As you see, it is not black, and there are different theories as to how it came by its name. Some say it was founded by a family called Blecche or Blatch, others assert that the church was initially run by monks who wore black robes and lived in the adjoining cottage. The chapel has always been a "peculier" chapel and is run by trustees, independantly of diocesan jurisdiction. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ford End, Black Chapel, C14
58 North End - Black Chapel
North Fambridge - Holy Trinity  A mid-18th century church with arched windows and a bell turret.  A half-timbered entrance lobby/vestry was added to the west end in 1912 by Chancellor. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Fambridge, Holy Trinity
59 North Fambridge - Holy Trinity
North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene  The nave and chancel were built late in the twelfth century, although the south doorway is a Norman survival fram an earlier building. The north aisle was added during the thirteenth century and the north chapel added c. 1300. The tower is fifteenth century. The whole is built of ragstone and flint with dressings of Reigate stone. The church was restored in during the nineteenth century.  In 1075 a church building existed in North Ockendon, attached to Westminster Abbey. At that time, according to the Regesta regum Anglo-Normannorum 1066 - 1154,  it was said that "the judgment of fire and water was held there by ancient custom". This is probably the building which survives in the south doorway: but of the ancient custom, there is no record. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon
60 North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene
North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene Window  North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene Window : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon, Window
61 North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene Window
North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene _Poyntz Reliefs  Sir Gabriel Poyntz (d. 1608) erected several monuments to himself, his son and his daughter, and to many of his ancestorors. Collectively, they are quite staggering.  In 1644 his descendant Richard Poyntz found a rather more useful means of spending money: he left £200 in his will for the poor of North Ockendon. In 1647 the legacy, supplemented by £24 belonging to the parish, was used to buy about 40 acres of land at Horndon-on-the-Hill. The annual income from this land was used to provide clothing, coal, bedding, and money for the poor for the next 300 years. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon, Poyntz, Memorial, Monument
62 North Ockendon - St Mary Magdalene _Poyntz Reliefs
North Ockendon - Detail  North Ockendon - Detail : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon, Poyntz, Memorial, Monument
63 North Ockendon - Detail
North Ockendon - Poyntz Marriage  North Ockendon - Poyntz Marriage : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon, Poyntz, Memorial, Monument
64 North Ockendon - Poyntz Marriage
North Ockendon - Poyntz Canopy  The marble effigies on the 1607 tomb of Sir Gabriel and Audrey Poyntz lie facing upwards towards the heavens, a painted canopy of the tetragrammaton Yahweh, Sun, Moon and stars. : Poyntz, canopy
65 North Ockendon - Poyntz Canopy
North Ockendon - Poyntz Tomb  The tomb of Sir Gabriel and Audrey Poyntz.  Sir Gabriel's father Thomas was a friend and supporter of William Tyndale (1494 - 1536) who was a scholar and religious reformer. During the reign of Henry VIII, Tyndale translated the Bible into English. This was heresy at the time and Tyndale was eventually captured and burnt at the stake. Thomas Poyntz, who had supported his friend financially at first, then by smuggling English Bibles into England hidden in bales of cloth, and finally by writing letters of support to members of Henry's court, was also branded a heretic; he lost his business and died later in poverty. Ironically, two years after the death of Tyndale Henry VIII had a change of heart and ordered that an English Bible should be used in every church throughout the land. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Ockendon, St Mary, Ockendon, Poyntz, Memorial, Monument
66 North Ockendon - Poyntz Tomb
North Weald - St Andrew  The oldest parts of St Andrews Church, the nave, aisle and lady chapel, date from around 1330 and are built of flint rubble, brick, and limestone. The red-brick Tudor tower is entirely of brick and is unusually high, in four stages with an embattled parapet resting on a corbel table of small segmental arches.   The church suffered a major fire in January 1964 which destroyed much of the interior of the building. The subsequent restoration retained many original features including the 14th century windows and piscina.  The churchyard contains a small military graveyard for members of the RAF and the Essex Regiment.The Church has close links with North Weald airfield, which was one of the most active airfields during the Battle of Britain and a base for Hawker Hurricanes and Bristol Blenheim night fighters. The airfield was bombed repeatedly during the Battle of Britain and 39 aircrew were killed, but the airfield was never put out of action.  In 1940, two American Eagle Squadrons moved into North Weald supplied with Spitfires. A couple of years later, Norwegian squadrons were re-assigned to the airfield. More than 50 squadrons from 7 nations were stationed at RAF North Weald and the last, 111 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, left North Weald in February 1958. 111 squadron formed the RAF aerobatics team "The Black Arrows", which evolved into the Red Arrows.  The Standard of 56 Squadron hangs inside the church. : Architecture, Church, Essex, North Weald, Tudor, RAF, Battle of Britain:, St Andrew
67 North Weald - St Andrew
Norton Mandeville - All Saints Video  Video : Norton Mandeville, Vimeo, Video
68 Norton Mandeville - All Saints Video
Norton Mandeville - All Saints  All Saints Church consists of a nave, chancel, and south porch with a small bell-cote at the west end of the nave. The walls are of flint rubble dating mostly from the first half of the 14th century, but mixed with this are blocks of freestone from a previous 12th-century church. Buttresses have been built externally at various dates. The south porch dates from 1903. The square bowl of the font is Norman, probably from the original church although the tiles around its base are 14th century. The pews have 16th century carved poppyhead ends. The church has no electric lighting and instead is lit by 8 brass paraffin lamps, which are themselves over 100 years old.   The church survived a Parochial Church Council closure meeting by one vote in the early 1970s while a further meeting in 1983 voted to raise the £13,000 needed for urgent repairs. A round of annual fundraising events are still held. In 2000AD a Milliennium yew tree was planted in the grounds. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Norton Mandeville, All Saints, C14
69 Norton Mandeville - All Saints
Orsett - St Giles All Saints Interior  Orsett - St Giles All Saints : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Giles, Orsett, Norman, C15
70 Orsett - St Giles All Saints Interior
Orsett - Norman Arch detail  Orsett - Norman Arch : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Giles, Orsett, Norman, C15, C12, Doorway, Carving
71 Orsett - Norman Arch detail
Orsett - St Giles All Saints  This Grade I listed building has a Norman nave and two chancels. The first was added in about 1150, the second in 1500. The tower was built in the 15th century and  rebuilt during the 17th century. It contains eight bells. The south doorway is Norman, with well-preserved carving. : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Giles, Orsett, England, Norman, C15, C12
72 Orsett - St Giles All Saints
Orsett - Norman arch  Orsett - Norman arch : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Giles, Orsett, Norman, C15, C12, Doorway, Norman Carving
73 Orsett - Norman arch
Ovington - St Mary  This small 14th century church sits next to Ovington Hall. The chancel and nave, built from flint rubble,  share the same roof. The small weather boarded belfry rests on four timber posts inside the nave. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ovington, St Mary, C14
74 Ovington - St Mary
Paglesham Churchend - St Peter  St Peter consists of a heavily restored Norman chancel and nave, and a tower which was added in the 15th century. : St Peter, Paglesham, Pagelsham, Essex, Norman, C15
75 Paglesham Churchend - St Peter
Paglesham Churchend - St Peter interior  Norman nave and chancel:  heavily restored in 1883 by local man Zachary Pettitt who married the daughter of an oyster merchant. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pagelsham, Churchend, St Peter, Interior
76 Paglesham Churchend - St Peter interior
Panfield - St Mary  A 15th century flint church with nave, chancel and belfry, housing three bells, with shingled spire. The south porch is a good example of 15th century carpentry. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Panfield, St Mary
77 Panfield - St Mary
Pattiswick - St Marys  Now a private residence.  13th century nave. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pattiswick, St Mary, private
78 Pattiswick - St Marys
Pattiswick - St Mary  Now a private residence.  13th century nave. The bell-turret at the western end rests on a 14th century plain tiebeam; the structure is inaccessible, but 19th century purlins visible at the west gable suggest that it has been rebuilt. The building has a short octagonal spire, all weatherboarded. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pattiswick, St Mary, private
79 Pattiswick - St Mary
Pebmarsh - St John the Baptist  The 14th century tower is the earliest part of the current building. Inside the church, the roofline of an earlier nave - where it joined the tower - can be seen, showing that it was lower and narrower than the current one. The current larger nave was rebuilt in the 14th century, along with the chancel and additional north and south aisles. Around 1500, battlements in red Tudor brick were built on the top of the tower, with matching brickwork on the clerestory and aisle perimeters. At the same time the elaborate south porch was added, reinforcing the imposing image of a church in a commanding position above the village. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pebmarsh, St John, C14, Tudor, Clerestory
80 Pebmarsh - St John the Baptist
Peldon - St Mary  This Grade I listed church is on top of a hill at the centre of the village. The 15th century Kentish ragstone tower contrasts with the 16th century brick clerestory and buttresses. The short chancel was added in 1859. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Peldon, St Mary, Tudor, Clerestory
81 Peldon - St Mary
Peldon - St Mary - Interior  The hammerbeam nave roof is sixteenth century, built at the same time as the clerestory. It's beautiful.  The church was restored internally in the mid nineteenth century. The chancel arch and east window date from this time. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Peldon, St Mary, Tudor, Clerestory
82 Peldon - St Mary - Interior
Peldon - Hammerbeam Roof of St Mary's  Detail of the 16th century hammerbeam nave roof : Architecture, Church, Essex, Peldon, St Mary, Tudor, Clerestory, Hammerbeam
83 Peldon - Hammerbeam Roof of St Mary's
Peldon - St Mary - Font  The plain octagonal font is 13th century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Peldon, St Mary, Tudor, Font, C13
84 Peldon - St Mary - Font
Pentlow - SS Gregory & George  The nave and chancel are Norman. The apse is well preserved, with three windows. Pentlow church is one of six round towered churches in Essex. The main construction of the church is flint and pebble rubble with dressings of limestone and clunch. The tower (which has walls four feet thick) and north chapel date from the 14th century, although the north chapel was rebuilt in the 17th century. Inside the church a Norman west doorway survives: it would originally have been the main doorway into the church but today leads into the round tower. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pentlow, St Gregory, St George, Round Tower, Norman
85 Pentlow - SS Gregory & George
Pentlow - SS Gregory & George (2)  This church is a Grade 1 listed building.  In Norman times it was customary for a rounded apse to have three windows. The north chapel, although originally 14th century, was rebuilt in Tudor bricks and has stepped brick gables. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pentlow, St Gregory, St George, Round Tower, Norman
86 Pentlow - SS Gregory & George (2)
Pitsea - St Michael  The tower of St Michael's church, dated c1500, is all that remains on a high hill above Pitsea Creek. A concrete outline marks out the church's demolished nave, built 1871. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pitsea, St Michael, C16
87 Pitsea - St Michael
Pitsea Mount Compass  Pitsea Mount Compass : Architecture, Church, Essex, Michael, Pitsea, Compass
88 Pitsea Mount Compass
Pleshey - Holy Trinity  The core of the church, including the north, south and west crossing arches and probably the foundations of the north and south transepts are c.1394, built to serve a college founded at that date. The college disppeared during the Reformation, and the nave was purchased by the parishioners. The nave fell into disrepair and was rebuilt in brick in 1708. The tower was rebuilt and a chancel added c.1750. The church was almost wholly rebuilt in 1868 preserving only the medieval crossing arches. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Pleshey, Holy Trinity
89 Pleshey - Holy Trinity
Prittlewell - (Annunciation of) St Mary the Virgin  The ancient parish of Prittlewell existed long before Southend-on-Sea grew into a seaside town. The church here has 7th century Saxon beginnings as evidenced by a doorway in the Norman wall of the chancel. The embattled tower in Kentish ragstone was added around 1470, in the Perpendicular style. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Prittlewell, St Mary, C15, Perpendicular, Saxon, Norman
90 Prittlewell - (Annunciation of) St Mary the Virgin
Prittlewell - St Mary - Interior  During the 12th century a processional aisle was added to the south side of the nave. The south aisle was enlarged and completed in the late 15th century, almost doubling the size of the church. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Prittlewell, St Mary, Norman, C15, Interior
91 Prittlewell - St Mary - Interior
Purleigh - All Saints  Mainly 14th century but with some features suggestive of an older structure, the church was restored in the nineteenth century. The porch  was built around 1500.  The striking tower is mid-fourteenth century, built in four stages with moulded plinth and strings. The first and second stages are of alternate courses of dressed flint and squared ragstone, with one band of small yellow bricks and two bands of chequered flushwork. The third and fourth stages are of pebble rubble. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Purleigh, Saints, C14
92 Purleigh - All Saints
Quendon Church  The church is not dedicated to any particular saint. The nave and north and south arcades date back to the 13th century; the chancel to the 1500s. The gleaming weatherboarded belfry is from the 1960s. The church was brutally restored in 1861.   Rodwell in his 1977 survey "Historic Churches - A Wasting Asset " said: "In all, Quendon provides a good example of how mis-directed zeal for restoration and 'tidying' over the course of little more than a century has achieved a near-total destruction of the church's archaeological, architectural, historical and ecological heritage - although immaculate, it is but an historical sham." : Architecture, Church, Essex, Quendon, No Dedication
93 Quendon Church
Radwinter - St Mary the Virgin  Extensively rebuilt in 1870 with medieval south porch with upper oversailing storey. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Radwinter, St Mary
94 Radwinter - St Mary the Virgin
Rainham - St Helen St Giles  A late Norman church (c.1170) which is relatively unchanged from the original, not least because of the sensitive restoration work carried out between 1897 and 1910 by Ernest Geldart. The picture above shows the priest's door with its round arch decorated with two orders of zigzag carving. Inside, similar chevrons can be seen on the Norman chancel arch. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Rainham, Helen, St Giles, Norman
95 Rainham - St Helen St Giles
Ramsden Bellhouse - St Mary  Early 15th century timber framed and weather-boarded tower with splay-footed broach spire. The four post bell tower is carried on a heavy framed rectangular base. The nave and chancel were remodelled in the 19th century, retaining the 15th/16th century roofs. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ramsden, Ramsden Bellhouse, St Mary, C15
96 Ramsden Bellhouse - St Mary
Ramsden Crays - St Mary  Now a private dwelling, but the graveyard remains open to the public. Apart from the bell tower and broach spine the church was entirely rebuilt in 1871 in random stone and flint, with a tiled roof. Some of the features of the original 15th century church are incorporated in the rebuilding. The frame of the bell tower is 15th century, weatherboarded and surmounted by a shingled broach spire. Grade II listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ramsden, Ramsden Crays, St Mary
97 Ramsden Crays - St Mary
Rawreth - St Nicholas  The tower, arch and west wall of the north aisle remain from 1450, the rest has been rebuilt in 1882 to designs of Ernest Geldart, rector of Little Braxted, notably the flint and stone flushwork on the porch. : Rawreth, church, Essex, Tyrell, C15, C16, Tudor
98 Rawreth - St Nicholas
Rawreth - St Nicholas - Interior  Rebuilt by Geldart with a new north aisle and a longer chancel, which is also higher than the nave.  There was a south aisle but after earthquake and WW2 bomb damage it was removed and the arcade walled up. : Essex, church, Rawreth, arcade
99 Rawreth - St Nicholas - Interior
Rawreth - The Tyrells Monument  The Tyrells were powerful gentry elite in Essex, second only to the Coggleshalls. Edmund Tyrell of the Beeches Manor, Rawreth, was a Justice of the Peace who zealously prosecuted heretics of the Reformed Church and watched them burn at the stake. The inscription reads - Here under lyeth ye bodie of Edmund Tyrell late of Beaches and Ramesdon Barringtons Esquier who died at Whitstable in Kent ye VIII day November in the Year of o' Lord 1576 God graunte him a blessed resurrection : Rawreth, St Nicholas, Tyrell, monument, brass
100 Rawreth - The Tyrells Monument
Rettendon - All Saints  The church stands on high ground, its 15th century ragstone tower acting as a landmark for the area. The south doorway is Norman, while the chancel and nave date from the 13th century. : Rettendon, Essex, All Saints, Humfrey, Norman, C13
101 Rettendon - All Saints
Rickling - All Saints  All Saints Church at Rickling is a 13th-century flint church, although the nave's unusual proportions may indicate an earlier plan. The south aisle was added in the 14th century and the stone columns and arches onto the nave are visibly not upright!  The 14th century tower had brick quoins and battlements added in the 16th century  but this was rebuilt in 1973 in stone and flint to match the rest of the tower. The chancel, south aisle and west tower were built in 1340. The earliest part of the church is the  13th century lancet window  in the west wall which existed before the tower was added The fine tracery of the wooden screen is an excellent example of 14th century craftsmanship, and the 15th century pulpit is equally unspoilt. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Rickling, All Saints, C13, C14
102 Rickling - All Saints
Rickling - West Lancet Window  13th century lancet window high up on the nave west wall, above the tower door. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Rickling, All Saints, C13, C14, Window
103 Rickling - West Lancet Window
Ridgewell - St Lawrence  The church was rebuilt in the early 15th century at a time when Ridgewell prospered. The embattled tower, decorated with flint, has angle buttresses and a stair turret. The clerestoried nave, with late 15th century windows, has a north aisle. Grade I listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ridgewell, St Lawrence, C15, Clerestory, Grade 1
104 Ridgewell - St Lawrence
Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Chancel  The 15th century screen under the chancel arch displays some wonderful workmanship. The outer panels have been highlighted in red and gold. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ridgewell, St Lawrence, C15, Clerestory, Grade 1, Interior, Screen
105 Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Chancel
Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Funeral Bier  The oldest funeral bier in Essex, used to carry the dead to the grave. Telescopic handles slide out from the four corners. The legs are octagonal - the octagon being the Christian symbol for rebirth and resurrection. Made during the 15th century. : Church, Essex, Ridgewell, St Lawrence, C15, Bier, Funeral, Octagonal
106 Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Funeral Bier
Ridgewell - St Lawrence Roof  Above the 15th century clerestory windows, the splendid roof is supported by collar beams on arched braces, each alternate on resting on corbel supported shafts. There are the remains of intricate carvings on the braces - the figures of angels (or seraphims) are now gone, victims of Cromwell's anti-idolatry purges. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ridgewell, St Lawrence, C15, Clerestory, Grade 1, Roof
107 Ridgewell - St Lawrence Roof
Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Roof (detail)  Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Roof (detail) : Architecture, Church, Essex, Ridgewell, St Lawrence, C15, Clerestory, Grade 1, Roof
108 Ridgewell - St Lawrence - Roof (detail)
Roxwell - St Michael & All Angels  The church is probably fourteenth century in origin. The bell turret was added in the fifteenth or sixteenth century.   The church was heavily restored in Victorian times with the north aisle, porch and vestry added at that stage. The chancel was restored in 1872, and refurnished in 1881. The spire was rebuilt in 1891. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Roxwell, St Michael, C14, Bell Turret
109 Roxwell - St Michael & All Angels
Roxwell - St Michael and All Angels  St Michaels in Roxwell, showing the nineteenth century porch and spire.  Inside the church there are a number of monuments including 16th century brasses commemorating members of the Young family and some interesting marble memorials including a cherub leaning on a draped bust, commemorating members of the Barmston family who lived at Skreens nearby. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Roxwell, St Michael, C14, Bell Turret
110 Roxwell - St Michael and All Angels
Roydon - St Peter  A church has stood on this site in the heart of Roydon for over a thousand years. St Peter's is built of flint, with the earliest parts of the church dating back to around 1330. The tower is late 14th century with angled buttresses and battlements. Unfortunately, most of the south side of the church is obscured by a cemented hall added in 1971 in a stunning act of philistinism.  The chancel of the church was redesignated the Colte Chapel, named after the wealthy local Colt family, in a modernistic re-ordering of the church c1970. The altar from the chancel has been relocated, rather unconventionally, in the middle of the north aisle's north wall. It leaves the church with a strangely unfocussed 'boxy' feeling, and flies in the face of 2000 years of this isles' Christian tradition of east-west alignment. where east represents the rising sun, a symbol of resurrection. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Roydon, Peter, C14
111 Roydon - St Peter
Runwell - St Mary  Perpendicular style, restored by Chancellor 1867. 15th century timber porch. : Runwell, St Mary, Church, Essex
112 Runwell - St Mary