Saffron Walden - St Marys  The Parish church of Saint Mary the Virgin is the largest in Essex, with an overall length of 183 feet, whilst the height of the tower and spire is 193 feet.  There is believed to have been a Saxon church on this site, then a large Norman church was built here. This was in turn rebuilt and enlarged around 1250, before the current spectacular church was built in 'Perpendicular' style starting in about 1430. The later stages of this rebuilding were carried out under the supervision of John Wastell, a Master Mason who also built King's College Chapel in Cambridge. The exterior turrets which stand above the east end of the nave are typical of his work.  The spire is more modern being built in 1832. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Saffron Walden, St Mary, C15
1 Saffron Walden - St Marys
Saffron Walden - St Mary the Virgin : Saffron, Walden, arcade, nave, architecture, church
2 Saffron Walden - St Mary the Virgin
Sandon - St Andrew  The nave and chancel were built during the 12th and 13th century.  The north aisle was added iduring the 14th century, then the chancel was extended eastwards during the 15th century. The tower and south porch were added during the 16th century, and are of very high quality. This is perhaps because the manor of Sandon was given by Henry VIII to Cardinal Wolsey early in the sixteenth century: he may have been responsible for the tower and porch. The church has retained several 18th century windows. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Tudor
3 Sandon - St Andrew
Sandon - St Andrew  The nave and chancel are 12th/13th century The chancel was extended eastwards during the 15th century when the three light east window was inserted. The north aisle was added in the 14th century. The tower is 16th century, and is of very high quality. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Tudor
4 Sandon - St Andrew
Sandon - St Andrew Interior  The north aisle was added in the 14th century. The elegant three-bay arcade has shafts which are polygonal to the north and south, and semi-circular to the east and west. The nave was given a hammerbeam roof in the 15th century, which was replaced in Victorian times. A single truss with richly carved spandrels and moulded hammerbeams was retained. The plain, pointed chancel arch is 13th century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Tudor, Hammerbeam
5 Sandon - St Andrew Interior
Sandon - St Andrews - 360° Virtual Tour  Interactive  360° Panorama : 360 panorama, photosphere, Sandon, Church, Essex
6 Sandon - St Andrews - 360° Virtual Tour
Sandon - St Andrew Roof Detail  Roof Detail : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Tudor, Hammerbeam
7 Sandon - St Andrew Roof Detail
Sandon - St Andrew Lectern  The eagle lectern was carved from a single piece of oak. It was given to St Andrews by Queens College Cambridge in 1892. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, Lectern
8 Sandon - St Andrew Lectern
Sandon - St Andrew Pulpit  The fine fifteenth century octagonal "wine-glass" pulpit would originally have been brightly coloured. The stem and foot are preserved, which is rare. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C15, Tudor, Pulpit
9 Sandon - St Andrew Pulpit
Sandon - St Andrew Glass  Fragments of medieval glass : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Medieval, Medieval Glass, Window
10 Sandon - St Andrew Glass
Sandon - St Andrew East Window  The stained glass in the east window is by Heaton, Butler and Bayne, 1920. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sandon, St Andrew, C12, C13, Tudor, Window
11 Sandon - St Andrew East Window
Shalford - St Andrews  The church was originally built in the early 14th century and re-modelled and extended towards the end of the century.   It was extensively restored during the nineteenth century, however there are many original features to be seen. Much of the glass in the east window is 14th century The nave, chancel and the north and south aisles all date from the first half of the 14th century and the west tower is even older: some features at the base suggest it dates from the twelfth century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shalford, St Andrew, C14
12 Shalford - St Andrews
Shalford - St Andrews interior  The church has a rich and complex history, having been extended and re-modelled many times over the centuries. The oldest extant fabric is at the base of the tower, which is 12th century: much of the nave and chancel was built early in the 14th century, although altered and widened toward the end of the 14th century. Many of the windows date from the 14th and 15th century. The south porch is 14th century. The roof of the nave is 17th century. The font bowl is 15th century.  The church is usually open during the day, and it's an interesting building to visit: I particularly like all the human faces secreted around the place. The one remaining on the outside of the church porch is relatively recent, dating from the 19th century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shalford, St Andrew, C14, Interior
13 Shalford - St Andrews interior
Shalford - St Andrews Altar Tomb  A beautifully carved 14th century altar tomb inside St Andrews. The four faces (three men and a woman) at the top of this altar tomb in the south wall are so finely done that you feel you could recognise the individuals if you walked past them in the village. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shalford, St Andrew, C14, Interior, Altar Tomb, Carving
14 Shalford - St Andrews Altar Tomb
Sheering - St Mary  Situated on a hillside sloping down to Pincey Brook, this church has Norman origins. The current nave and chancel were rebuilt in the 14th century making them younger than the 13th century tower which is unbuttressed. The chancel roof and brick parapet of the tower were built in the 16th century and an oak staircare was put into the tower during the 17th century. The church was extensively restored in Victorian times.  The words on the clock face say "Today is Yours". : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sheering, St Mary, C13, C14
15 Sheering - St Mary
Shelley - St Peter  The present church was built in 1888. It is the third church dedicated to Saint Peter to be built on the site. The original medieval church consisted of a nave and a stone chancel stone with a wooden turret, but this fell into disrepair towards the end of the 18th century and was declared unsafe in 1800. A second church was approved in 1810. By 1886 this was showing signs of deterioration and in 1888 permission to demolish and rebuild was granted, with the result you see above: a Victorian interpretation of the Early English style.   There is a memorial stone in the outside west wall of the church under which was laid a bottle containing a copy of the Essex County Chronicle, a copy of the London Standard, a number of coins and a brief record of the circumstances under which the church was being erected. During the rebuilding the upper part of a 17th century font, dating from the reign of William and Mary, was uncovered and this font is in use today. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shelley, St Peter
16 Shelley - St Peter
Shellow Bowells - St Peter and St Paul  Now a private residence.  Rebuilt in 1754 but retaining an uninscribed bell from early in the 17th century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shelley Bowells, St Peter, St Paul
17 Shellow Bowells - St Peter and St Paul
Shenfield - St Mary: Interior  The massive 15th century timbers supporting the tower dominate the west end of the nave. In 1927 some of the tower beams were found to have Death Watch Beetle, so steel girders were inserted beside the main beams to carry the weight of the 6 bell belfry. Separating the nave and north aisle is an unusual and  finely constructed timber arcade. It has five columns, each hewn from a whole tree trunk with carved capitals and bases, supporting a length of roof of almost sixty feet. The Caen stone font was installed in 1390, and the side facing the east shows the traditional pagan Green Man with leaves instead of hair. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shenfield, St Mary, C15, Wooden Arcade, Oak Arcade
18 Shenfield - St Mary: Interior
Shenfield - St Mary: Robinson Memorial  The only tomb memorial in the church is that of Elizabeth Robinson who died in childbirth aged 16 in 1652. She was the daughter of Walter Merrell, a Puritan and Parliamentarian. She married Timothy Robinson, a keen Royalist,  at the age of 15, but   "Lost her life to another, That she might unite in a closer bond of love, the families of her father and her husband"   At the side of the tomb is another skull centred over a collection of bones.. The alabaster figure, sited under the tower, is attributed to Thomas Burman, the 17th century London based sculptor. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shenfield, St Mary, C15, Memorial, Robinson, Monument
19 Shenfield - St Mary: Robinson Memorial
Shenfield - St Mary: Robinson Tomb  Shenfield - St Mary: Robinson Tomb : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shenfield, St Mary, C15, Memorial, Robinson, Monument
20 Shenfield - St Mary: Robinson Tomb
Shenfield - St Mary the Virgin  With 13th century origins, it is the 15th century that provided this rural church with some interesting timber features, namely the south porch and the tower, weather-boarded belfry, and slender shingled spire. When the north aisle was added in the 15th century, an arcade with 6 bays was made from timber, rather than traditional stone. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shenfield, St Mary, C15
21 Shenfield - St Mary the Virgin
Shrub End - All Saints  Built in 1845 in Decorated style by architect George Russell French to serve the growing population of Lexden and Stanway, Colchester, to coincide with the creation of the new Stanway parish. The parish was renamed Shrub End in 1960.   In red brick, with Caen stone dressing and splay-footed slated spire. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Shrub End, All Saints
22 Shrub End - All Saints
South Benfleet - St Mary the Virgin  This imposing church is built on the site of the Danish chieftain Haesten's camp, where King Alfred defeated the Viking invaders in 893. The original Anglo-Saxon church no longer survives but Norman features in the nave are still present. The tower is 14th century, topped by a white painted mini-spire added in 1706. The ornate timber porch is 15th century, with a single hammer-beam roof with tracery panels. : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Benfleet, Benfleet, St Mary, C14
23 South Benfleet - St Mary the Virgin
South Hanningfield - St Peter  Norman with 14th century belfry : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Hanningfield, Hanningfield, Norman, St Peter, Belfry
24 South Hanningfield - St Peter
South Ockendon - Philistinism  Philistinism : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Ockendon, Ockendon, St Nicholas
25 South Ockendon - Philistinism
South Ockendon - St Nicholas  A Grade I listed church of Norman origins with a round tower - one of only 6 in the county. During its restoration in 1866, it was reclad in black knapped flint. The smaller octagonal tower is a rood-stair turret. : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Ockendon, Ockendon, Round Tower, St Nicholas
26 South Ockendon - St Nicholas
South Ockendon - St Nicholas (2)  The striking circular tower is 13th century, although the top section with battlements is from the restoration work undertaken in 1866. : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Ockendon, Ockendon, St Nicholas, Round Tower
27 South Ockendon - St Nicholas (2)
South Weald - St Peter  Originally medieval with the tower added in c.1500, St Peter's was effectively rebuilt in 1867-9 by Teulon. In addition to the north and south aisles shown here there was a further more recent extension on the north side built in 1980 and described by Pevsner as "depressing".  Internally the church has elaborately carved reredos of marble and alabaster, some commemorative brasses including one of Sir Anthony Browne (d. 1567) - the founder of Brentwood School - and a number of wall monuments. One of the monuments (to the Ven F.J.H. Wollastom d.1823) is in the shape of a sarcophagus and bears the inscription "He went to bed in perfect health October 11th 1823, and was found a corpse Sunday morning, reader reflect!". : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Weald, St Peter
28 South Weald - St Peter
South Weald - St Peter Font  St Peter's font was created in 1662 and is carved with leaves rather than the more usual religious symbols. : Architecture, Church, Essex, South Weald, St Peter, Font
29 South Weald - St Peter Font
Southend - All Saints  All Saints is a long towerless late Victorian red brick building, with a rose window at the west end.  Originally, it was designed to have a massive brick tower with tiled steeple on the south-west corner. However, as frequently happened for new churches, this non-essential element was not carried out. The church overlooks a busy roundabout on the A13 in Southend. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southend, All Saints
30 Southend - All Saints
Southend - Clifftown Congregational  Architect W. A. Dixon. North aisle and porch added 1887, balconies to north and south aisles 1897. Kentish Ragstone with Bath stone dressings; concrete tile roofs. The south west tower has an octagonal bell-chamber and spire. The dwindling congregation in the late 20th century resulted in its closure, until being converted to theatre studios by Essex University in 2007. Grade II listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southend, Clifftown, Congregational
31 Southend - Clifftown Congregational
Southend - St John the Baptist  St Johns was the first Parish Church of the town of Southend-on-Sea, built in 1842 by T.Hopper. The original neo-Norman simplicity of his design has since been messed up by gradual additions of aisles, chancel, chapels, vestries, transepts etc. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southend, St John
32 Southend - St John the Baptist
Southend - St Mark  Built by Edward Wright in 1885 as a Baptist tabernacle.The orientation was reversed in 1901 when taken over by the Church of England - the porch becoming the sanctuary. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southend, St Mark
33 Southend - St Mark
Southminster - St Leonard  The church is  a hodge-podge of alterations and add-ons. The nave was heightened in the 15th century using flint with clerestory windows (either side of the blue sundial dated 1814). Above that, a layer of red brick was added in 1819. The two huge transepts north and south were also added in 1819. Around this time the chancel was extended and a three sided sanctuary added, all covered in cement : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southminster, St Leonard, Clerestory, C14
34 Southminster - St Leonard
Southminster - St Leonard - Tower  This is one of the Dengie Peninsula's two minster churches of the Christian Saxon period. The first is St Peter's Chapel founded by St Cedd at Bradwell in 654.  The second church was certainly in existence by the 10th century, named "South minster" to distinguish it from St Peter's which was in effect the North Minster. The west tower of St Leonard's was built in the 14th century, propped up with a massive south west buttress. There is a decidedly unfinished look about the whole structure, topped with stone and flint battlements. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Southminster, St Leonard, C14
35 Southminster - St Leonard - Tower
St Lawrence - St Lawrence  The parish church of the village of St Lawrence is dedicated to St Lawrence.The church was built of ragstone, in 1877, on the site of two older churches. The Church is sometimes called St Lawrence Newlands because the original church was built on land newly deforested. It seems odd to think of this area as once forested; these days it is all open farmland.  Most services in the village of St Lawrence are held in the Church Hall. During the summer months the church is home to displays of art and local history.  Three generations of the Wedgewood Benn family lie beneath the floor of the chancel including the  Lord Stansgate, father of the politician Anthony Wedgwood Benn. : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Lawrence, ragstone, Victorian
36 St Lawrence - St Lawrence
St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul  A large Grade I listed building with previous Saxon and Norman incarnations, but now mostly Tudor.  The 13th century chancel remains, and the heavily-buttressed tower is  14th century. The 16th century nave is flanked by hugh aisles with Perpendicular windows: the southern aisle is linked to the tower via a 16th century stair tower.  The church is close to St Osyth's Priory. : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Osyth Tudor, C14, C13, C16
37 St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul
St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul - Arcades  The 16th century nave with its distinctive red brick piers and brick arches separating it from the aisles, topped with an elegant hammer-beam roof. The church contains a unique "sheepfold" communion rail. : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Osyth, Tudor, C16, Hammerbeam
38 St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul - Arcades
St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul - Sheepfold Rail  In the chancel is a unique 'horseshoe' or 'sheepfold' communion rail pictured above. This is Victorian replacement of a 17th century wooden one of the same shape. With the open end towards the congregation, the sheepfold is used as an enclosure for those receiving communion. : Sheepfold, rail, communion, St Osyth, C17
39 St Osyth - SS Peter & Paul - Sheepfold Rail
St Osyth - Priory  St Osyth's Priory was established in 1120 by Richard de Belmeis, Bishop of London, for Augustinian canons. A few fragments of the original Norman building remain, together with several 13th century additions. The Gatehouse seen here was built in the late fifteenth cetury and the abbey was dissolved in 1539. It is now privately owned.   Acccording to legend, Osyth was the wife of Sigehere (born 63), King of the East Saxons. She had sworn to remain a virgin. Once he accepted that their wedding would never be consummated he gave her the village on Chich (now St Osyth's) where she founded a nunnery. Later she was captured by Viking raiders and beheaded for her refusal to worship their pagan gods. : Architecture, Church, Essex, St Osyth Tudor, C15
40 St Osyth - Priory
St Osyth - Priory Chimneys  Detail of the brickwork and decorative finish of the late 15th century priory gatehouse : Architecture, Church, Essex, Tudor, Chimney, Brickwork, St Osyth Tudor, C15
41 St Osyth - Priory Chimneys
Stambourne - St Peter & St Thomas  The massive squat Norman tower dominates the church. The thick walls are made from flint, incorporating Roman brick around the round-headed windows.  The body of the church - the nave, north aisle and chancel and chapel were rebuilt in the 15th century thanks to the patronage of the Mackwilliam family. Grade I listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stambourne, Grade 1, St Peter, St Thomas, C15
42 Stambourne - St Peter & St Thomas
Stambourne Church - Chancel Screen  16th century paintings on the dado of the chancel screen, depicting (left) a decapitated St Denys holding his mitred head in his hands, St George & dragon,St Edmund, and Edward the Confessor with orb & sceptre. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stambourne, St Peter, Chancel Screen, C16, St Thomas
43 Stambourne Church - Chancel Screen
Stambourne - St Peter & St Thomas - East Window  The stained glass in the bottom corners of the east window of St Peter and St Thomas are dated by the heraldry to before 1532. They were commissioned by the Mackwilliam family, showing (on the left) the kneeling figure of Christian Mackwilliam (f), and (on the right) a male figure in armour thought to be her husband Edward. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stambourne, St Peter, Window, C16, St Thomas
44 Stambourne - St Peter & St Thomas - East Window
Stanford-le-Hope - St Margaret of Antioch  Although this church was originally Norman it has been remodelled many times. The north nave is 13th century and the south, 14th century. The tower and the west front are both Victorian.  Internally the south chapel and screen date from 1400 and the font is c. 1250. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stanford-le-Hope, St Margaret, C13, C14
45 Stanford-le-Hope - St Margaret of Antioch
Stanford Rivers - St Margaret of Antioch  St Margaret's was built around 1150. The nave pane uses the traditional Norman plan of two squares, so that its length is twice that of it width. The chancel was rebuilt and enlarged in the mid-15th century, when the nave was also re-roofed. The 15th century timbers had been plastered over in the 18th century but were exposed when damaged by a German V1 bomb in 1944. There are 5 Norman lancet windows which remain. The weather boarded belfry is 15th century with a leaded broach spire. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stanford Rivers, St Margaret, Norman, C15, Belfry
46 Stanford Rivers - St Margaret of Antioch
Stanford Rivers - St Margaret's Mural  This mural is behind the octagonal 13th century font on the north wall of the nave. It was painted by Fyffe Christie (1918-1979) in 1961, and depicts a nativity scene with figures based on Stanford Rivers villagers of the time. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stanford Rivers, St Margaret, Mural
47 Stanford Rivers - St Margaret's Mural
Stansted Mountfitchet - St John  Built in 1887-9 the church is made from local (Birchanger) brick to a conventional layout, with a nave and south aisle with short transepts. The eastern end of the south aisle was fittted up as a Lady Chapel in 1905.  The most distinctive feature of the church is the extraordinary tower built in 1894-5 and festooned with gargoyles, pinnacles and stepped battlements. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stansted, Mountfitchet, St John
48 Stansted Mountfitchet - St John
Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary  St Mary's Church was built c.1120 and the tower added in 1692. The exterior was extensively remodelled in Victorian times but the Norman north and south doorways have been retained. The church is much more interesting on the inside:  there is a richly carved 12th century chancel arch, some 13th century arcading in the chancel and the font is also 13th century. In addition, there are a number of beautifully carved marble and alabaster monuments. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stansted, Mountfitchet, St Mary, Norman C12, C17, C13
49 Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary
Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary Interior  The Norman chancel arch leads into a 13th century chancel. The elaborately carved marble tomb to the right of the altar belongs to Sir Thomas Middleton, Lord Mayor of London, who died in 1631. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stansted, Mountfitchet, St Mary, Norman C12, C17, C13, Carving
50 Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary Interior
Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary - Hester Sallisburye  Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary - Hester Sallisburye : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stansted, Mountfitchet, St Mary, Norman C12, C17, C13, Memorial, Sallisburye, Monument
51 Stansted Mountfitchet - St Mary - Hester Sallisburye
Stapleford Abbotts - St Mary  There has been a church on this site since before Norman times, but the current building is mostly 19th century. The squat brick tower was rebuilt in 1815, and the main body of the church rebuilt in 1861. The red-brick north chapel, built for the Abdy family, survives from 1638. The vestry also contains a 14th century stained glass window of Edward the Confessor. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stapleford Abbotts: St Mary
52 Stapleford Abbotts - St Mary
Stapleford Tawney - St Mary  The chancel (east end) was built first, in about 1220, followed by the nave and then the side chapel. The timber tower and porch were added in about 1500, and in 1862 the vestry was built and the whole church thoroughly restored. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stapleford Tawney, St Mary, C13
53 Stapleford Tawney - St Mary
Stapleford Tawney - St Mary's Tower  Unlike the rest of the church, the tower is of timber, with massive oak posts with braced tie-beams and saltire cross braces. It is more or less free-standing, being built within the older flint walls. The belfry contains two bells, dated 1611 and 1630. The ceiling of both nave and chancel were given pine panelling in the 1862 restoration, the chancel part being repainted in pale blue afer a fire in 1968. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stapleford Tawney, St Mary, C13
54 Stapleford Tawney - St Mary's Tower
Stapleford Tawney - 12th C. Stone Coffin  During the 1862 restoration of the church, two 12th century stone coffins were found - one under the nave, the other under the new vestry. Wooden coffins are a relatively recent convention.  The gently coped stone lid has two carvings of a cross-like symbol, but they may also be symbols denoting the person's rank or profession.  Poorer members of the community were not buried in coffins. Their bodies were wrapped in a cloth shroud and placed in a communal grave. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stapleford Tawney, St Mary, C13, C12, Coffin
55 Stapleford Tawney - 12th C. Stone Coffin
Stapleford Tawney - Casket Monument  The large raised casket monument north-west of the church marks the undergound vault of the Cunliffe-Smith family. Originally for Susannah, Charles Smith's first wife, it dates from 1796. It carries the family coat of arms, and was designed by the architect Joseph Bonomi. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stapleford Tawney, St Mary, C13, Momument
56 Stapleford Tawney - Casket Monument
Stebbing - St Mary the Virgin  This Grade I listed building dates from around 1360 and is built in decorated style on the site of an earlier church. The first record of this building relates to a baptism in 1377. The church has a beautiful stone rood screen inside  - one of only 3 in the world. The others are at Great Bardfield in Essex and in Trondheim Cathedral in Norway. During restoration work in 2010 remnants of medieval wall paintings were discovered on the walls of the church. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Sy Mary, Grade 1, Clerestory
57 Stebbing - St Mary the Virgin
Stebbing - St Mary (Interior)  Inside St Mary's is this beautiful stone screen,with intricate carved tracery,  one of only three in the world.  It dates from c. 1340. The elegant flat-pitched nave and chancel roofs date from around 1500. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Sy Mary, Grade 1, Clerestory, Rood Screen, Stone, C14
58 Stebbing - St Mary (Interior)
Stebbing Roof Angels  Carved wooden roof angels are a notable feature of Suffolk and Norfolk churches, but not normally associated with Essex. They represent an important part of medieval iconography, and some of the more inaccessible ones managed to survive the purging of churches of graven images by 17th century iconoclasts.  The roof in St Mary's Stebbing is an arched braced tie-beam roof, rather than hammerbeam. The bracket below each principal beam would have been the more obvious place to site the angels, but instead the angels are placed higher up on either end of the intermediate principals. There are 10 angels on these sub-principals, as well as smaller ones at the boss of each tie-beam on the west and east wall. Each angel holds a plain shield. Roof angels were usually painted with bright colours, and the shield might bear a coat of arms or symbols of religious significance.  The wings of an angel denoted their role as spiritual messenger, as they hovered protectively over the congregation below. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Sy Mary, Grade 1, Clerestory
59 Stebbing Roof Angels
Stebbing Rood Screen Corbels  These mid-14th century  figures are on the base of either side of the rood screen arches. They are not quite "grotesques", but the angle of of the human heads and the frog-like squatting posture is certainly very strange. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Sy Mary, Grade 1, Clerestory, Rood, Screen, Corbel, Carving
60 Stebbing Rood Screen Corbels
Stebbing: Nave Roof of St Mary's  The roof in St Mary's Stebbing is an arched braced tie-beam roof, rather than hammerbeam, and is graced with carved roof angels. The bracket below each principal beam would have been the more obvious place to site the angels, but instead the angels are placed higher up on either end of the intermediate principals. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Sy Mary, Grade 1, Clerestory, Roof, Angel
61 Stebbing: Nave Roof of St Mary's
Stebbing - Friends Meeting House  The Stebbing Meeting House is the earliest Quaker meeting house in Essex. Built c.1674 it is a particularly fine and complete example of an early Quaker meeting house. In 1672 the laws against non-conformist religions were repealed, local Quakers bought a plot of land in Stebbing and built the Meeting House. Realising correctly that the atmosphere of religious tolerance was likely to be short-lived, they set the building back from the road behind a cottage.  Its historical importance is recognised by its Grade II* status. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stebbing, Friends, Quaker, C17
62 Stebbing - Friends Meeting House
Steeple Bumpstead - St Mary  The tower and chancel of this Grade I listed church were built during the 11th century. The nave and porch date from the late 14th or early 15th century. The eastern part of the tower, tops of the aisles, clerestory and top of the porch are of early sixteenth century brick.  The south aisle roof added during the 16th century is by Thomas Loveday and is particularly fine, with carved tie-beams and ridge and a carved rose pendant hanging from the middle of each principal tie-beam.   Most of the exterior features of the church, including the window tracery, belong to a restoration of 1877/80.  The church is in the heart of the village, opposite a pub and just a few yards from the moot hall. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Steeple Bumpstead, St Mary, Grade 1, C14, Tudor, Loveday
63 Steeple Bumpstead - St Mary
Steeple - St Lawrence & All Saints  The original parish church of St Lawrence in Steeple was destroyed by fire and the current church was built at a new site in the centre of the village in 1884. An old doorway and one window were reused, and the octagonal font bowl dates from the 15th century. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Steeple, Lawrence
64 Steeple - St Lawrence & All Saints
Steeple - St Lawrence & All Saints - Porch  The original parish church of St Lawrence and All Saints was pulled down following a fire and the current church re-built in a more convenient position, in 1884. Much of the material in the original church was re-used. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Steeple, Lawrence
65 Steeple - St Lawrence & All Saints - Porch
Stifford - St Mary  St Mary's has a  squat 13th century tower, with an oak-shingled spire, and nave of the same period made from flint, and signs of earlier Norman origins, for example with the north doorway. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stifford, St Mary, Norman, C13
66 Stifford - St Mary
Stock - All Saints  For much of its history, All Saints  was a chapel dependent on nearby St Mary, Buttsbury. Buttsbury is now depopulated, and Stock has become the much larger settlement.   The plan of the nave of All Saints suggests it was built in the twelfth century, although the foundations may be Anglo-Saxon. The nave and chancel are probably 12th century. During the 15th century the north aisle, south porch and belfry tower were added. The tower was extended eastwards in the late 17th century. The nave was restored, and the chancel rebuilt in 1847-8. The north chapel was added in 1904. The church was badly damaged by a German parachute mine in 1940.  Inside the timber belfry a carved painted face - the 'Green Man' - covers the apex of the huge timber oak beams. Over the west doorway are the original oak traceried windows. The belfry, together with a surviving 15th century north aisle roof, mean the building is Grade I listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stock, All Saints, Grade 1
67 Stock - All Saints
Stock - All Saints (Interior)  Inside, All Saints is bright and light. Although the nave was restored and the chancel rebuilt in 1847-8, this work was done sympathetically.   On the south wall of the nave is a brass memorial to Richard Twedye, 1574, showing the figure of a man in armour and achievement-of-arms set in a black marble slab. The marble is a cut down altar-slab, with two consecration-crosses remaining at the lower corners. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stock, All Saints, Grade 1
68 Stock - All Saints (Interior)
Stock - All Saints - Base of Timber Belfry  Fine C15 carpentry of the timber belfry, framed on 4 vertical posts, with 5 three-light traceries above its door of timber.
69 Stock - All Saints - Base of Timber Belfry
Stock - Christ Church  Essex has always been a county full of independent minded people, and many non-conformist and dissenting churches and chapels exist in the county. The Essex Congregational Union was formed in 1798, and initially Congregationalists in Stock worshiped at the house of William Moss, who owned Stock windmill.  In 1813 the first Congregational Chapel was built in Mill Road. This continued to be used until 1889 when the current chapel was built in the High Street. The building continued as a Congregational Church until 1972, when Congregationalism became part of the United Reform Church. Stock declined to enter this new Denomination, and in 1974 the chapel became known as "Christ Church" - the Free Church in Stock. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Christ Church, Free Church, United Reform, Stock
70 Stock - Christ Church
Stondon Massey - St Peter & St Paul  The nave and chancel date from about 1100, the bell turret and the porch were added in the 15th century and in the 19th century the vestry, organ chamber and chapel were added and the porch rebuilt. Some of the windows and the south door still survive from the original building.   William Byrd (d.1623) lived at Stondon Place for the last thirty years of his life. He was a well known composer during the reign of Elizabeth I, and he and Thomas Tallis shared the post of organist at the chapel royal. However he was a known Catholic and refused to attend Anglican services (meaning he regularly appeared in the quarterly local assizes and paid heavy fines for recusancy) and in later years his membership of the chapel royal was suspended, his house searched and restrictions were placed on his movements. Despite this, he is buried in the churchyard, in an unmarked grave. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stondon Massey, St Peter, St Paul, C12, C15
71 Stondon Massey - St Peter & St Paul
Stow Maries - St Mary & St Margaret  Originally built in flint and rubble in the 15th century. In the 16th century, Tudor brick was used to partly rebuild the nave and add height. The chancel was raised on brick stepped gables and, unusually, is higher than the nave. A lighted cross is mounted on the 17th century weather boarded steeple. This was presented to the church in 1925 by Claude Ridley of No. 37 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps, based at Stow Maries, formed to defend England against German Zeppelin attacks in the First World War. Several pilots are buried in the churchyard. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stow Maries, St Mary, St Margaret, C15, C16, RAF
72 Stow Maries - St Mary & St Margaret
Stow Maries - St Mary & St Margaret Interior  This is a delightful church which is full of interesting history.  The church, dedicated to St. Margaret, was established in the 13th century to replace an earlier manorial chapel attached to the Manor of Mareys (='Marsh') . Sadly it is in a poor state of repair and desperately needs funds.  The building has sunk, so the pews slope downwards  towards the north and south at quite an alarming angle : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stow Maries, St Mary, St Margaret, C15, C16, RAF, Interior
73 Stow Maries - St Mary & St Margaret Interior
Stow Maries Altar  The three paintings in oil and gilt depict Gabriel appearing to Zacharia, Mary and Daniel. These are exceptionally fine late 19th century paintings reminscent of Walter Crane in the Arts and Crafts style. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stow Maries, St Mary, St Margaret, C15, C16, RAF, Altar
74 Stow Maries Altar
Stow Maries - Rood Stairs  Stow Maries - Rood Stairs : Architecture, Church, Essex, Stow Maries, St Mary, St Margaret, C15, C16, RAF, Rood Stairs
75 Stow Maries - Rood Stairs
Strethall - St Mary the Virgin  This isolated church has a Saxon nave, with long-and-short work visible particularly at the western quoins. The lower stage of the tower is Norman with the upper stages added in the 14th century. The chancel is a 15th century addition, much restored in the 1860's. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Strethall, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, C15
76 Strethall - St Mary the Virgin
Strethall - St Mary - Chancel Arch  Chancel arch : Architecture, Church, Essex, Strethall, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, C15, Chancel, Arch
77 Strethall - St Mary - Chancel Arch
Sturmer - St Mary  St Mary's is situated on a hill outside the village next to Sturmer Hall, overlooking farmland. The church has a Saxon nave and Norman chancel. The tower was added during the 14th century and the porch, early in the 16th century. The double hammerbeam roof is believed to be by Thomas Loveday. St Mary's is Grade I listed. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sturmer, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, Loveday, Carving
78 Sturmer - St Mary
Sturmer - St Mary -  Norman Door  The Norman south door has one order of columns with scalloped capitals and a zigzag pattern in the arch. The tympanum is decorated with irregularly placed ornamental crosses and rosettes. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sturmer, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, Loveday, Carving
79 Sturmer - St Mary - Norman Door
Sturmer - St Mary - Saxon Doorway  The 11th century Saxon doorway in the north wall of St Mary's is decorated with a chequer pattern on the lintel. The adjacent window appears to have been re-built with Tudor bricks. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sturmer, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, Loveday, Carving, C11
80 Sturmer - St Mary - Saxon Doorway
Sturmer - St Mary: Sundial  The early 16th century south porch of Sturmer church has a stepped gable and at the apex, the sundial has been angled to catch the afternoon sun. It doesn't work in winter, being perpetually in the shade of a huge yew tree. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sturmer, St Mary, Saxon, Norman, Loveday, Carving, Sundial
81 Sturmer - St Mary: Sundial
Sutton - All Saints  A Norman church with many interesting features including a typical 14th century Essex weather-boarded belfry on posts, and a distinctive Norman chancel arch. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14
82 Sutton - All Saints
Sutton Church Chancel Arch  Probably the best feature of this church is the Norman chancel arch with scalloped capitals and painted roll moulding. The outer order of chevrons is a trompe l'oeil effect,  as they are painted. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14, Chancel, Arch, Carving
83 Sutton Church Chancel Arch
Sutton - All Saints Belfry Timber  Looking up at the 14th century bell turret timbers. The four central posts are supported by trellis strutting. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14, Belfry
84 Sutton - All Saints Belfry Timber
Sutton - All Saints Roof  The nave looking west, showing the roof and and 4+4 post timber belfry structure. Posts along the north and south wall of the nave carry the weight via a curved brace, which provides additional support to the central four posts directly under the belfry. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14, Roof, Belfry
85 Sutton - All Saints Roof
Sutton - Chancel Arch Detail  Sutton - Chancel Arch Detail. The outer order of chevrons is painted. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14, Norman, Carving, Chancel, Arch
86 Sutton - Chancel Arch Detail
Sutton Church, Essex - Brass  A medieval coffin lid is used to display the brass from the demolished church at Shopland, of Thomas Stapel, 1371,  in armour with sword, pointed bascinet and comail, as he would have worn at the Battle of Crecy. He was Sergeant-at-arms to King Edward III, ie one of the king's bodyguards. : Architecture, Church, Essex, Sutton, All Saints, C12, C14, Memorial, Brass
87 Sutton Church, Essex - Brass
Takely - Holy Trinity  This church is Grade I listed. Although there are some features from the 11th century, in the main it consists of a 13th century chancel, 14th century nave and south aisle, and the tower and south porch are 15th century The church was restored during the 19th century. Inside, there is a modern rood screen, complete with rood.  In medieval times, rood screens (which separated the public area of the church from the ceremonial altar) were surmounted by a large crucifix, known as the rood. These were a focus for worship, especially during the Easter period. For example, during Lent the rood would be veiled, to be revealed on Palm Sunday. During the reformation all the medieval roods in the UK were destroyed. The rood screen inside Holy Trinity was installed in 1910. : Church, Essex, Holy, Trinity, Grade 1, C13, C14
88 Takely - Holy Trinity
Tendring - St Edmund King & Martyr  The church has a rag-stone tower built in 1876 and a Victorian south aisle, but the rest is basically 13th century. : Church, Essex, Tendring, St Edmund, C13
89 Tendring - St Edmund King & Martyr
Tendring - C14 Porch  The wooden north porch is 14th century. The carved timber door-cases are a remarkable rarity, not seen anywhere else in the Archdeaconry. : Church, Essex, Tendring, St Edmund, C14, Porch
90 Tendring - C14 Porch
Tendring - St Edmund  The early 14th century door gable is carved with quatrefoil shapes, with some elongated into mouchettes (dagger like shapes). These sorts of tracery designs are more usually seen in the tracery of church windows from the period. The south door arch now leads into the south aisle. The timbers around the doorway support an early hammerbeam roof, one of the oldest in the country : Church, Essex, Tendring, Doorway, C14, Hammerbeam
91 Tendring - St Edmund
Tendring - St Edmund - Hammerbeam  The unusual roof truss sits across the south and north doorways at the west end of the nave - the south door now leads into the south aisle. The ingenious 14th century carpenters used large timber frames for each door using the gable to support wall posts and braces of two hammerbeam supports, which in turn bear the weight of the roof.  Pevsner remarked: "The tracery detail of the gables is clearly of the fourteenth century, and not too late in the century either, and thus this truss is earlier than the hammerbeam roof of Westminster Hall, in the text books still called 'the earliest in existence' " : Church, Essex, Tendring, Roof, C14, Hammerbeam
92 Tendring - St Edmund - Hammerbeam
Terling - All Saints  The church is placed alongside the village green. The chancel and font are 13th century, the nave somewhat later and the tower was added in 1732 and appears to have an external bell. : Church, Essex, Terling, All Saints, C13, C18
93 Terling - All Saints
Terling - All Saints - Interior  The church was restored internally in the 19th century. The four bay south aisle dates from the 15th century  and has slightly wonky octagonal piers with concave sides and wave-moulded arches, copied on the Victorian north aisle without the wonkiness. The communion rail is early 18th century. The windows were renewed in 1945 following war damage. : Church, Essex, Terling, All Saints, C13, C18, Arcade
94 Terling - All Saints - Interior
Terling - All Saints - Font  The 13th century octagonal font has two blank pointed arches to each side. : Church, Essex, Terling, All Saints, C13, C18, Font
95 Terling - All Saints - Font
Theydon Bois - St Mary  The church was designed by Sydney Smirke, and completed in 1850 to replace an earlier one on the Abdridge Road which had to be demolished. The tower is topped by a copper clad spire and contains three bells which were brought from the old church, two medieval and one Victorian. : Church, Essex, Theydon Bois
96 Theydon Bois - St Mary
Theydon Garnon - All Saints  Parts of the nave date from the 13th century, included the scissor-braces of the roof,  with additions in the 15th century. There is a north aisle in red brick built in 1644, and inside the arches and octagonal columns of the five-bay arcade are made of oak. With Epping Forest so close, timber was a cheaper and more readily accessible building material than stone. The Tudor tower was built c1520 in red brick with interspersed blue bricks. It is of three stages with an embattled parapet. The building id Grade I listed.  The church has been near to the main route to London for centuries as the old Roman road passes within a few hundred yards to the east of the building and the medieval road to London passes to the west (The Monks' Way). : Church, Essex, Theydon, Garnon, C15, C13, Tudor
97 Theydon Garnon - All Saints
Theydon Mount - St Michael  This church was built in 1614 after the previous medieval church burned down.  Most of the cost of the new building was borne by the Smith family who lived at Hill House nearby, using bricks made in their own brickworks The chancel is clearly made from different materials. The church website states that this is because re-building the chancel was the responsibility of the Rector, who could only afford poor quality bricks. However Pevsner suggests that the chancel might be an additon made in 1577 (when Sir Thomas Smith was interred in a new vault beneath it) which survived the fire. The church contains numerous memorials to the Smith family. The building is Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Theydon, Mount, St Michael, C17
98 Theydon Mount - St Michael
Theydon Mount - St Michael - Porch  A previous medieval church on this site burned down in 1610. The nave, tower and porch of the replacement church were built in 1614 The porch has an elaborately shaped gable and a four-centered doorway,  with an aedicule above, of Tuscan pilasters and a pediment. : Church, Essex, Theydon, Mount, St Michael, C17, Porch
99 Theydon Mount - St Michael - Porch
Thorpe-le-Soken - St Michael  The chancel and nave were rebuilt in 1876. The Tudor tower in red brick with blue diapering and diagonal buttresses dominates the scene. : Church, Essex, Thorpe-le-Soken, St Michael, Tudor
100 Thorpe-le-Soken - St Michael
Thorrington - St Mary  Undergoing extensive repairs to tower and ceiling (March 2014). Knapped flint tower with battlements dated 1480. : Church, Essex, Thorrington, St Mary, C15
101 Thorrington - St Mary
Thundersley - St Peter  The original medieval eaves of this church are low - 9 feet from the ground, but the 1885 rebuild incorporated a much higher and steeper roof. As a consequence the old 15th century shingled belfry with splay-foot spire looks disproportionately small. The church stands alone at the top of the hill,and now seems misplaced between the segments of modern urban sprawl around Benfleet and the A13. : Church, Essex, Thundersley, St Peter
102 Thundersley - St Peter
Tilbury - Our Lady Star of the Sea  Tilbury docks opened in 1886 and a Roman Catholic mission was established there a year later. This church was opened in 1907, designed in a version of Early English style in bright yellow brick with dressings and window surrounds of red brick.  The building consists of a five bay nave and a chancel under a continuous pitched roof, the division marked by a bellcote on the ridge. : Church, Essex, Tilbury, Our Lady, Roman, Catholic
103 Tilbury - Our Lady Star of the Sea
Tilbury juxta Clare - St Margaret  The imposing Tudor tower by de Vere (1519) is in red brick with blue diaper work, with stair turret and battlements. The nave and chancel are 15th century. Grade I listed. : Church, Essex, Tilbury, juxta, Clare, St Margaret, Tudor, C16, Grade 1
104 Tilbury juxta Clare - St Margaret
Tilbury-juxta-Clare - Tudor Wall Painting  One of the faded Tudor paintings in the nave. This one shows ' a Tudor man with white horse in front of house with contemporary brick nogging'. : Church, Essex, Tilbury, juxta, Clare, Mural, Tudor
105 Tilbury-juxta-Clare - Tudor Wall Painting
Tillingham - St Nicholas  St Nicholas is an integral part of the classic scene of the Essex village with white-painted weather boarded cottages next to the village-green pub. The north doorway is Norman and the chancel is Early English (13th century) with stepped lancet windows. The tower is 14th century. : Church, Essex, Tillingham, St Nicholas, C13, C14
106 Tillingham - St Nicholas
Tillingham - Peculiar Peoples Chapel 1867  The Peculiar People were followers of a strict puritannical form of evangelism, founded in Rochford in 1838, which swept through Essex in the Victorian era. Tee-total, soberly-dressed, they attended day-long services on Sunday where the main activity was prayer, and hymns sung without accompaniment by music. Believing in divine healing, they eschewed orthodox medicine instead putting their faith in prayer and laying on of hands. The chapel in Tillingham, completed in 1867, is one of the last remaining Peculiar chapels (43 in all) to survive intact. The site is now fenced off and overgrown, probably awaiting conversion to residential flats. : Church, Essex, Tillingham, Peculiar, Chapel
107 Tillingham - Peculiar Peoples Chapel 1867
Tilty - St Mary the Virgin  St Mary's is a Grade I listed building which was originally the gatehouse chapel of a great Cistercian Abbey. It has an enormous, striking east window and a high ceiling with original 12th century beams.  The church as a whole is an odd building. The14th century stone chancel is conjoined to a Georgian nave, which is low, pale pink, and has a cupola on top.  The Abbey itself  was destroyed in 1536. All that remains are a few sections of wall in the field to the north of the church : Church, Essex, Tilty, Grade 1, St Mary, Window
108 Tilty - St Mary the Virgin
Tiptree - St Luke  St Luke's Church was built in 1855/6. It is a plain building in the early English decorated style, surmounted by a bell turret and spire. The walls are of red brick, with grey bricks in bands. Internally, the church is beautifully light and airey, and huge - it seats up to 500 people.  At the time St Luke's was built, Tiptree was relatively undeveloped. There was no village as such, no medieval church, just marsh and forest.  In 1841, John Mechi bought land and a farmhouse in the area, seeing its potential. He drained the soil, ensured development of the local road network and was instrumental in the creation of a Parish of Tiptree. In 1864 Arthur Wilkin inherited farmland in the area and began to cultivate fruit; the jam factory followed and the village of Tiptree started to grow. By 1900 around 1,000 people lived in the village, and by 2000 the population was nearer 11,000. It seems the building of this large and internally elegant church was prescient. : Church, Essex, Tiptree, St Luke
109 Tiptree - St Luke
Tiptree - St Luke  The interior of St Lukes (built in 1856) is quite a suprise. Externally, the mood is dark and a bit forbidding: internally, it is light, open and welcoming.There is a nave with a lovely vaulted roof and an aisle on either side. The chancel terminates with a circular apse containing the communion table. : Church, Essex, Tiptree, St Luke, Interior, Arcade, Apse
110 Tiptree - St Luke
Tollesbury - St Mary  The base of the tower dates from the 11th century. The doorway is Tudor. The large window is in perpendicular style and the two windows above this are 15th century. The parapet walls and pinnacles which top the tower were built in the 17th century. Inside the church are the Swearing Font, and the Seafarers Window.  The Swearing Font: in 1718 the local churchwardens were so appalled by the drunken swearing of a parishioner that they fined him £5. With the money they commissioned a new font, and had carved on it the words 'Good people all I pray take care that in ye Church you doe not sware As this man did'. An entry in the registers for 30th August 1718 explains: "Elizabeth daughter of Robert and Eliza Wood, being ye first child which was baptised in the new font which was bought out of five pounds paid by John Norman who some months before came drunk into ye Church and cursed and talked aloud in the time of Divine Service, to prevent his being prosecuted for which he paid by agreement the above said five pounds. Note that the wise Rhyms on the font were put there by sole order of Robert Joyce then Church Warden".  The Seafarers Window: a 15th century window with modern glass commemorating the close association between Tollesbury and the sea. The centre light shows a post resurrection appearance of Christ. In the left hand light are images of four yachts that have contended for the 'The Americas Cup'. Tollesbury yachtsmen have been intimately connected with the yacht race since it started in 1851, participating in fifteen of first sixteen races, and Captain Ted Heard of Tollesbury skippered three of the entries. In the right hand light are four Essex coastal vessels; a Billy Boy; a ketch rigged barge;  a 'Stackie' (built to carry straw and hay to London); and a Tollesbury oyster smack. : Church, Essex, Tollesbury, St Mary
111 Tollesbury - St Mary
Tolleshunt D'Arcy - St Nicholas  This Grade I listed building is made of ragstone from Maidstone, Kent, rather than the more usual flint. The nave and tower are 14th century, the chancel, south porch and north chapel all 15th century. The floor of the bell chamber is original. Internally, there are several well preserved brasses (from the 14th, 15th and 16th century) and several marble monuments, mostly commemorating members of the D'Arcy family. : Church, Essex, Tolleshunt, D'Arcy, St Nicholas, C14, C15, Grade 1
112 Tolleshunt D'Arcy - St Nicholas
Tolleshunt Major - St Nicholas - Detail  Detail of bell chamber windows - elegantly constructed red Tudor brick. : Church, Essex, Tolleshunt, Major, St Nicholas, C15, Tudor
113 Tolleshunt Major - St Nicholas - Detail
Tolleshunt Major - St Nicholas  Most of the current building is 15th century although there are some Norman features. The tower and north chapel were added during the 16th century. The church was restored in the 19th century.  The tower was built by Sir Stephen Beckingham at the same time as the Gate House of Beckingham Hall (situated about 200 yards north east of the church). It is built of red Tudor bricks with blue brick diapering. : Church, Essex, Tolleshunt, Major, St Nicholas, C15, Tudor
114 Tolleshunt Major - St Nicholas
Toppesfield - St Margaret of Antioch  This Grade I listed building dates mainly from the fourteenth century, with later additions. The south aisle was added in around 1300. The magnificent tower was built in 1699 and there is a commemorative slab in the west wall inscribed 'To the memory of Mr. Robert Wilde late Rector of this Parish who gave 100 l. towards ye building ye steple Anno 1699', with the names of the rector, churchwarden and bricklayer. In the east window of the south aisle there is some glass still remaining from the 15th century, depicting a kneeling angel with censer, fragments of a female saint and a censing angel, probably part of the Coronation of the Virgin. : Church, Essex, Toppesfield, St Margaret, C14, C17, Grade 1
115 Toppesfield - St Margaret of Antioch
St Margarets of Antioch  This Grade I listed building has a fourteenth century nave & chancel; the striking tower was built in 1699. : Church, Essex, Toppesfield, St Margaret, C14, C17, Grade 1
116 St Margarets of Antioch
Twinstead - St John the Evangelist  The oldest known church on this site had become a ruin by 1790. The Bishop refused to consecrate its replacement which was pulled down and its materials used to erect a third church. This in turn was considered inferior "with no ecclesiastical character", and was replaced by the present church in 1859. The Gothic Revivalist architect Henry Woodyer created a striking design with red brick decorated with bands of contrasting black and yellow bricks. The sharp angle of the roof is echoed by the steeply pitched gable of the open belcote. The chancel has an unusual multi-foiled round window set in an almost triangular architraved frame. : Church, Essex, Twinstead, St John, Woodyer
117 Twinstead - St John the Evangelist
Twinstead - St John the Evangelist - Nave  The red and black brickwork used on the outside of the church is even more striking in its use in the interior. The brickwork is used to outline blank arcades and provide a trellis of diagonal red and black bricks. The bold geometric patterns are developed further in the chancel, and the west clerestory window, with its geometric tracery, echoes the triangular shape of the south chancel window. The stone chancel screen, of three equal arches, is a rare feature only seen in two other churches in England - one being in Great Bardfield, Essex and the other the 14th century stone rood screen of Stebbing, Essex, which Woodyer was to restore in 1884.  The stained glass by Hardman with rich hues of blues and purples adds to the effect. All in all, this church is a fascinating and idiosyncratic design, exemplifying the certainty of Victorian confidence and the modernism of the architect Woodyer. : Church, Essex, Twinstead, St John, Woodyer, brickwork
118 Twinstead - St John the Evangelist - Nave
Twinstead - St John the Evangelist - Altar  The Chancel of St John the Evangelist and the extraordinary polychromatic designs of Henry Woodyer (1816–1896). : Church, Essex, Twinstead, St John, Chancel
119 Twinstead - St John the Evangelist - Altar